Aquaculture and resilience: Women in aquaculture in Nepal

Farming-based rural livelihoods are becoming increasingly vulnerable to the effects of global climate change and sudden and profound changes in social and economic systems. Diversification of livelihood options is believed to be vital to maintaining ecosystem resilience and building social systems resilience. Integrated agriculture-aquaculture (IAA) farming systems, considered among the promising options for small-scale farming households in China and Vietnam, are likely be relevant in the context of mixed crop- livestock farming systems elsewhere as well.

Annual report

The program on aquatic agricultural systems (AAS) aims to change the way the CGIAR engages with aquatic agricultural systems and the poor and vulnerable communities who depend upon them.

Alleviating poverty through aquaculture: progress, opportunities and improvements

Significant changes in our understanding of the interrelationships between aquaculture and poverty have occurred in the last decade. In particular, there is a growing realization that the impacts of aquaculture need to be assessed from a value-chain perspective rather than through a narrow production focus. In recent years, understandings of poverty and the forms, outcomes and importance of aquaculture have also shifted. Terms in current use are first clarified, including those related to scale and location of aquaculture.

Adapting tropical Pacific fisheries and aquaculture to climate change: management measures, policies and investments

The main purpose of this book is to assess how changes projected to occur under low (B1) and high (A2) emissions scenarios in 2035 and 2100 could derail plans by the Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs) to use the sustainable benefits of fisheries and aquaculture to foster economic development, government revenue, food security and livelihoods.

Watershed governance: livelihoods and resource competition in the mountains of mainland Southeast Asia

This paper examines the challenges of managing the upper watersheds of mainland Southeast Asia, taking local livelihoods and resource competition as its point of departure. The analysis presents the factors of change that drive economic, environmental, and social transfromations of the area. These dynamics highlight the need for greater attention to the governance and challenges of the uplands- how are decisions over resource use made, who makes them, and to whose benefit?

Water, poverty and inland fisheries: lessons from Africa and Asia

Relying on experience from West Africa and the Mekong Basin, the authors contend that small-scale inland fisheries are a critical element in the livelihoods of many farming households who live near water bodies in developing countries. Empirical evidence suggests that the relation between poverty and small-scale fisheries cannot be reduced to a simple correlation with income. A more thorough analysis is required.

Understanding livelihoods dependent on inland fisheries in Bangladesh and Southeast Asia: Vietnam PRA report

During the period of May to July 2002, An Giang University, in conjunction with the Chau Phu, Thoai Son and Chau Doc District People's Committees, and Can Tho University conducted Participatory Rural Appraisals (PRAs) in four different Provinces. The research findings from this study are presented in this report. The purpose of this exercise was to better understand the livelihoods of people living in rural areas and depending mainly on inland capture fisheries.

Understanding livelihoods dependent on inland fisheries in Bangladesh and Southeast Asia: synthesis report

This report provides an assessment of the livelihoods strategies of the poor people dependent on inland fisheries in Bangladesh, Cambodia, the Lao PDR and Vietnam. Drawing upon the results of a one year investigation under the Project entitled "Understanding Livelihoods Dependent on Inland Fisheries", policies and institutions for fisheries management and livelihoods assets of the stakeholders in inland fisheries in the four countries. The report also discusses the trends and changes in fisheries and wetland resources.

Trade matters in the fight against poverty: narratives, perceptions, and (lack of) evidence in the case of fish trade in Africa

Two opposing views exist in the literature on the potential role that international fish trade plays in economic development. While some claim that fish trade has a pro-poor effect, others denounce the negative effect of fish export on local populations’ food security and doubt its contributions to the macro-economy. In this paper, we explore this debate in sub-Saharan Africa. Our analysis did not find any evidence of direct negative impact of fish trade on food security; neither did it find evidence that international fish trade generates positive, pro-poor outcomes.

Snake prices and crocodile appetites: aquatic wildlife supply and demand on Tonle Sap Lake, Cambodia

Commercial trade is a major driver of over-exploitation of wild species, but the pattern of demand and how it responds to changes in supply is poorly understood. Here we explore the markets for snakes from Tonle Sap Lake in Cambodia to evaluate future exploitation scenarios, identify entry points for conservation and, more generally, to illustrate the value of multi-scale analysis of markets to traded wildlife conservation. In Cambodia, the largest driver of snake exploitation is the domestic trade in snakes as crocodile food.


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