Feed the future aquaculture project: October 2011-Sept 2012

The Feed the Future Aquaculture project is a five year transformative investment in aquaculture focused on 20 southern districts in Barisal, Khulna and Dhaka divisions, Bangladesh. This report describes the achievements of FtF-Aquaculture project activities implemented during FY12. Some of the targets for production and associated income have not been achieved yet as a large share of the fish will be harvested after closing of the reporting period. However, on the basis of growth monitoring, indications are that production is on track to achieve the targets.

Engaging the private sector to address conflict in natural resource management

International investments in agroindustry present a growing source of tension for local populations who rely on land, forests, water and fisheries for their livelihoods, particularly where local tenure security is put at risk. For governments, civil society organizations and the communities directly affected, engaging the private sector early is critical in order to avoid an escalation of conflict and to build collaboration that can yield dividends for all. Yet care must be taken to address power differences among actors and to avoid manipulation by individuals or interest groups.

An ecosystem approach to small-scale fisheries through participatory diagnosis in four tropical countries

Participatory diagnosis is an approach to identify, prioritize and mobilise around factors that constrain or enable effective governance and management in small-scale fisheries. Diagnostic frameworks are mostly designed and used for systematic scientific analysis or impact evaluation. Through participation they also have potential to guide contextually informed improvements to management in practice, including transitions to contemporary forms of governance like the ecosystem approach to fisheries (EAF).

Dialogue to address the roots of resource competition: Lessons for policy and practice

Conflict management is an intrinsic element of natural resource management, and becomes increasingly important amid growing pressure on natural resources from local uses, as well as from external drivers such as climate change and international investment. If policymakers and practitioners aim to truly improve livelihood resilience and reduce vulnerabilities of poor rural households, issues of resource competition and conflict management cannot be ignored.

Collaborative dialogue to support local institutions in natural resource co-management

Co-management of natural resources entails sharing authority and responsibility among government agencies, industry associations and community-based institutions. Policymakers and development agencies have embraced the approach because of the potential to improve the effectiveness, efficiency and equity of management efforts focused on common-pool resources such as forests, pasturelands, wetlands and fisheries.

Assessing adaptation options for climate change: A guide for coastal communities in the Coral Triangle of the Pacific. 3. Impact and adaptation assessment workshop

This brochure is part of a series that collectively detail how a community-based assessment of climate change was used in partnership with coastal communities and provincial and national-level stakeholders in Timor-Leste and Solomon Islands. The assessment contains four distinct, but related, steps focused on supporting community-level decision-making for adaptation through a series of participatory action research activities. Each brochure in this series details a specific activity in the four-step assessment.

Aquaculture technology exchange between Bangladesh and Nepal in the Agriculture and Nutrition Extension Project

Technology and knowledge transfer has been a great challenge for many developing countries in South Asia due to poor information and communications technology networks. A limited number of institutions focused on science and technology, weak linkages among private and public institutions and political instability. These factors have hampered the successful transfer and diffusion of new and proven technologies between countries.

WorldFish report 2010/11

This year's report contains the Director General's and Chairman's statements illustrating the major thrust of and progress with the approved 2011 strategy. It incorporates details of the financial statement for the past year. There are highlights from projects covering the enhancement of coastal fisheries, livelihood in the Philippines, programs on lake fisheries in Malawi, to capacity building in terms of long term training for local partners and stakeholders.

Vulnerability in inland fishing communities in Africa: lessons learned

A critical first step in understanding vulnerability in inland fishing communities is to move away from classical fishery definitions that consider only the resource and harvest methods and, instead, recognize that fisheries operate across broad domains including the natural resource and its ecosystem, people and livelihoods, institutions and governance systems, and external drivers.

Understanding livelihoods dependent on inland fisheries in Bangladesh and Southeast Asia: Vietnam PRA report

During the period of May to July 2002, An Giang University, in conjunction with the Chau Phu, Thoai Son and Chau Doc District People's Committees, and Can Tho University conducted Participatory Rural Appraisals (PRAs) in four different Provinces. The research findings from this study are presented in this report. The purpose of this exercise was to better understand the livelihoods of people living in rural areas and depending mainly on inland capture fisheries.

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