WorldFish

At WorldFish, we work with an extensive network of donors and partners to create change for the millions who depend on fish in the developing world. Partnerships are essential to bring technologies and innovations to scale and achieve development impact. By 2024, WorldFish and our donors and partners will improve the lives of 7 million direct beneficiaries and 23 million indirect beneficiaries.

Resilient livelihoods and food security in coastal aquatic agricultural systems: Investing in transformational change

Aquatic agricultural systems (AAS) are diverse production and livelihood systems where families cultivate a range of crops, raise livestock, farm or catch fish, gather fruits and other tree crops, and harness natural resources such as timber, reeds, and wildlife. Aquatic agricultural systems occur along freshwater floodplains, coastal deltas, and inshore marine waters, and are characterized by dependence on seasonal changes in productivity, driven by seasonal variation in rainfall, river flow, and/or coastal and marine processes.

Value chain analysis of the Egyptian aquaculture feed industry

The commercial aquaculture feed industry in Egypt is growing at a rapid rate. As a result, the number of fish feed mills has increased from just 5 mills producing about 20,000 t per year in 1999, to over 60 mills with a current production estimate of 800,000–1,000,000 t/year. The performance of the aquafeed industry in Egypt is not well understood, as the value chain structure has not yet been mapped.

The role of farmed fish in the diets of the resource-poor in Egypt

The Egyptian aquaculture industry provides more than 100,000 full-time or part-time jobs and produces the country’s least-expensive farmed animal protein. Thus, aquaculture plays an important role in both sustaining livelihoods and improving the diet quality and nutritional health of Egyptians, including a significant proportion of the 25.5% who are resource-poor. Recognizing this dual role, WorldFish has promoted sustainable growth in Egyptian aquaculture for more than 20 years.

Report of the genetics team meeting of the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish. Kenya, 30-31 July 2012

The CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish started in January 2012. It aims to increase the productivity of small-scale livestock and fish systems in sustainable ways, making meat, milk and fish more available and affordable to poor consumers across the developing world. Genetics is one of the three technological components of the Livestock and Fish research program. A genetics team meeting was held on 30-31 July 2012, at the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), Nairobi.

More meat, milk and fish by and for the poor --- CGIAR Research Program 3.7 - proposal

This CGIAR Research Program’s vision is for the health, livelihoods and future prospects of the poor and vulnerable, especially women and children, to be transformed through consumption of adequate amounts of meat, milk and/or fish and from benefiting from the associated animal source food value chains. CRP3.7 aims to realize this vision by seizing upon an unprecedented opportunity to integrate and exploit three ongoing revolutions – the Livestock Revolution, the Blue Revolution and the Gene Revolution.

Impacts of climate change on the agricultural and aquatic systems and natural resources within CGIAR's mandate

The document attempts to distil what is currently known about the likely impacts of climate change on the commodities and natural resources that comprise the mandate of CGIAR and its 15 Centres. It was designed as one background document for a review carried out by the High Level Panel of Experts on Food Security and Nutrition (HLPE) at the behest of the UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS) on what is known about the likely effects of climate change on food security and nutrition, with a focus on the most affected and vulnerable regions and populations.

Genetic improvement of freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii (de Man) in India. Phase two

Macrobrachiurn rosenbergii is one of the widely cultured freshwater prawn species globally. India was the third largest producer of this species in 2007 and its aquaculture production rose to 43,000 metric tons (t) in 2005 froin less than 500 t in 1995. However, since then production has been declining and in 2008-09 it was 12,856 t, a reduction of more than 70% compared to 2005. There are several contributing factors to this decline, such as slow growth rate, poor survival, disease outbreaks, increase in cost of production, and availability of low risk alternative fish species.

More meat, milk and fish by and for the poor --- CGIAR Research Program 3.7 - Fish

As a member of the Consultative Group for International Agricultural Research (CGIAR). The WorldFish Center will partner with several other CGIAR Centers in the CGIAR Research Program 3.7 "More meat, milk and fish by and for the poor". The focus of research for the fish components of the Program are on technology platform and integrated value chain research.

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