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How aid can support sustainable fisheries for a food-secure world

On World Fisheries Day, we have traditionally discussed the challenges fisheries face and the threats to their sustainability. However, we need to shift the focus to solutions that will ensure a continuing supply of fish for the millions who rely on them for both livelihoods and food security.

CT ATLAS: Maps That Tell The Coral Triangle Story

If every map could tell a story, the CT Atlas (http://ctatlas.reefbase.org) would be a veritable Arabian Nights collection of 1001 different stories and more, each story painting a unique picture of the ecologically and culturally diverse Coral Triangle region. One common thread runs through these stories, however, and it begins with the Atlas’s own back story to weave a single, unified narrative that urges and inspires cooperation.
 

Greening the economy: economic benefits of sustainable development

Balancing human demand for land and food with the need to protect the world’s dwindling natural resources is a global challenge. For developing nations, the challenge can seem insurmountable in the face of booming populations, entrenched poverty and limited institutional know-how for creating sustainable resource management policies. Developing nations can also miss out on tapping into the vast economic benefits that can come with reducing environmental damage and over-exploitation.

Crisis sentinel indicators: Averting a potential meltdown in the Coral Triangle

The Coral Triangle (CT) includes some or all of the land and seas of six countries: Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, the Solomon Islands, and Timor-Leste (CT6). It covers only 1.1% of the world's area, but is the global hotspot for marine biodiversity and a rich spawning area for tuna. One-third of the CT6 population and millions more from outside the region are dependent on these resources. However, a range of human pressures threaten the biological health and diversity in the CT, affecting the food security and livelihoods of these people. A set of Crisis Sentinel Indicators (CSI) has been proposed to discuss the current state of affairs of the Coral Triangle based on the three dimensions of sustainability: Ecological, Socioeconomic, and Governance indicators. Furthermore, a Pressure-State-Response (PSR) analysis was performed for each CT6 country, using the three dimensions of sustainability, to capture and discuss the local state of affairs.
 

Women's Lived Realities in Malaysia: Socio-legal perspectives

Guest seminar presented by Prof Noraida Endut from the Women's Development Research Center (KANITA), University Sains Malaysia, 14th April, 2013.

Sunday, April 14, 2013

WorldFish provides overview of Marine Protected Area management in Malaysia

Malaysia is home to spectacular and diverse marine life, protected and managed by its Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). The WorldFish CT Atlas team hosted a Marine Protected Area (MPA) Management Effectiveness Assessment Tool (MEAT) training workshop last week to demonstrate how MPAs can be evaluated.
 

Mapping the Bounty of the Coral Triangle

The warm tropical waters of the Coral Triangle in the South Pacific cover a little over 1% of the Earth’s surface, yet are host to over three quarters of all recorded coral species and thousands of fish species. The staggering biological diversity of marine life is sustained by an equally diverse mix of habitats including river estuaries, mangrove forests, seagrass beds and coral reefs. The 6.8 million square kilometers of the Coral Triangle cover the waters around the eastern half of Indonesia, as well as the Philippines, Malaysia, Timor-Leste, Papua New Guinea, and the Solomon Islands.

Choosing the best model in the presence of zero trade: a fish product analysis

The purpose of the paper is to test the hypothesis that food safety (chemical) standards act as barriers to international seafood imports. We use zero-accounting gravity models to test the hypothesis that food safety (chemical) standards act as barriers to international seafood imports. The chemical standards on which we focus include chloramphenicol required performance limit, oxytetracycline maximum residue limit, fluoro-quinolones maximum residue limit, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) pesticide residue limit. The study focuses on the three most important seafood markets: the European Union’s 15 members, Japan, and North America.
 

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