Technical characteristics and economic performance of commercial Tilapia hatcheries applying different management systems in Egypt

This study was carried out in order to understand the technical and economic characteristics of different Egyptian Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) hatchery systems. Hatchery operators at fifty tilapia hatcheries in four governorates were interviewed and four focus group discussions were held with 61 participants in March 2012.

Mfumo wa Ikolojia katika uvuvi mdogomdogo unaoendeshwa kwenye bahari za tropiki: Tanzania

Usimamizi hafifu wa uvuvi umechangia katika uharibifu wa rasilmali, kukuza umaskini na ukosefu wa uhakika wa chakula duniani kote. Ili kudhibiti hali hii, mfumo wa ikolojia, unaotoa kipaumbele kwenye uendelevu na usawa katika usimamizi wa uvuvi, umebuniwa. Mpango huu unaoendeleza mfumo wa ikolojia katika uvuvi mdogomdogo wa bahari kwenye maeneo ya tropiki, unafadhiliwa na European Union, na unaongozwa na Taasisi ya WorldFish. Mpango huu unatekelezwa kwa ushirikiano na nchi za Indonesia, Philippines, visiwa vya Solomon na Tanzania.

Mangrove management in Solomon Islands: Case studies from Malaita Province

Mangroves are an important resource for the rural coastal people of Solomon Islands. Mangrove forests are critical for food security and the livelihoods of coastal communities in Solomon Islands. In particular, mangroves are an important source of food (e.g. fish, mangrove fruit, shells and crabs) and timber (e.g. for firewood and building materials).

Institutional arrangements in seasonal floodplain management under community-based aquaculture in Bangladesh

Seasonal floodplains under private and public ownership in the Indo-Ganges river basin provide food and income for millions of people in Bangladesh. Floodplain ownership regimes are diverse, covering the whole spectrum from public to private ownership. The paper compares community-based fish culture projects in these floodplains and analyzes the institutional arrangements of three different Floodplain Management Committees (FMC).

Improved management, increased culture and consumption of small fish species can improve diets of the rural poor

In many low-income countries with water resources, small fish species are important for the livelihoods, nutrition and income of the rural poor. The small size of fish favours frequent consumption by and nutrition of the rural poor, as these fish are captured, sold and bought in small quantities; used both raw and processed in traditional dishes; and are nutrient-rich. All small fish species are a rich source of animal protein, and – as they are eaten whole – have a very high content of bioavailable calcium. Some are rich in vitamin A, iron, zinc and essential fats.

Ghana coastal fisheries governance dialogue: Developing options for a legal framework for fisheries co-management in Ghana

The Third National Fisheries Governance Dialogue was a direct follow up on the Second National Fisheries Governance Dialogue held in Elmina in April 2012. It was agreed at the Second dialogue that co-management was the way forward for sustaining Ghana’s fisheries and that its success would depend on a supportive legal framework.

Fishing dynamics associated with periodically harvested marine closures

Periodically-harvested fisheries closures are emerging as a socially acceptable and locally implementable way to balance concerns about conserving ecosystem function and sustaining livelihoods. Across the Indo-Pacific periodically-harvested closures are commonly employed, yet their contribution towards more sustainable fisheries remains largely untested in the social and ecological context of tropical small-scale fisheries.

Evaluating the management effectiveness of marine protected areas at seven selected sites in the Philippines

Fisheries is a vital sector in the Philippine economy, providing a significant source of both domestic and export earnings while meeting essential food security and nutritional requirements. However, marine resources in the Philippines are facing increasing pressure from overfishing, destructive fishing practices, habitat destruction, declining water quality and limited management capacity. Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are part of the management strategy to address these issues but the majority of MPAs around the world do not meet their management objectives.

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