Payments for hilsa fish (Tenualosa ilisha) conservation in Bangladesh

Hilsa was once abundantly available in the 100 rivers of Bangladesh. Fishermen used to catch plenty of hilsa which were sold fresh to the local and urban markets. It was a cheap fish and was affordable even to the poor. However, its population has declined significantly over the last 30 years. Such a decline in catches prompted the government of Bangladesh to declare four sites in the country's coastal rivers as hilsa sanctuaries restricting fishing during the breeding season.

Meeting the food and nutrition needs of the poor: the role of fish and the opportunities and challenges emerging from the rise of aquaculture

People who are food and nutrition insecure largely reside in Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa and for many, fish represents a rich source of protein, micronutrients and essential fatty acids. The contribution of fish to household food and nutrition security depends upon availability, access and cultural and personal preferences. Access is largely determined by location, seasonality and price but at the individual level it also depends upon a person's physiological and health status and how fish is prepared, cooked and shared among household members.

Managing Aquatic Agricultural Systems to improve nutrition and livelihoods in rural Myanmar (MYNutrition)

The Managing Aquatic Agricultural Systems to Improve Nutrition and Livelihoods in Rural Myanmar (MYNutrition) project intends to adapt and scale up the successful innovative integrated aquaculture and fisheries/agriculture-nutrition linkages developed under the IFAD-funded Small Fish and Nutrition project in northeast and northwest rural Bangladesh in 2010-2013.

Improving productivity and environmental performance of aquaculture

Fish—including finfish and shellfish—are an important item in the human food basket, contributing 17 percent of the global animal-based protein supply in 2010. They are an especially valuable food source in developing countries, where more than 75 percent of the world’s fish consumption occurs. In addition to protein, fish contain micronutrients and longchain omega-3 fatty acids that are essential for maternal and child health, but often deficient in the diets of the poor.

Foods and diets of communities involved in inland aquaculture in Malaita Province, Solomon Islands

Solomon Islands has a population of just over half a million people, most of whom are rural-based subsistence farmers and fishers who rely heavily on fish as their main animal-source food and for income. The nation is one of the Pacific Island Counties and Territories; future shortfalls in fish production are projected to be serious, and government policy identifies inland aquaculture development as one of the options to meet future demand for fish.

Food and nutrition security in Timor-Leste

This report is a literature review on Food and Nutrition Security in Timor-Leste based on data from surveys conducted by the Timor-Leste National Statistics Directorate, as well as from national and international organizations working in Timor-Leste. This review was supported by the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR)-funded project “Strategy for Investment in Fisheries in East Timor”.

Fish for nutrition

More than 2 billion people worldwide, particularly in developing countries, are estimated to be deficient in micronutrients, including vitamin A, iron and zinc. These vitamin and mineral deficiencies are a form of undernutrition affecting children and pregnant women. This fact sheet outlines the key benefits of eating fish, a source of micronutrients and essential acids, in alleviating nutrient deficiency.

Fish and the nutrition of rural Cambodians

In Cambodia, fish is a central source of food for the rural poor due to its abundance and availability, and contributes greatly to national food security. In this paper, we review how fish is a staple food, provides quality proteins and as well as essential fatty acids, and combats micronutrient deficiencies. Despite the fact that fish is highly nutritious and widely consumed in Cambodia, the Cambodian population still suffers from severe malnutrition. Children and women are specifically more prone to deficiencies.

Faltering fisheries and ascendant aquaculture: Implications for food and nutrition security in Bangladesh

Bangladesh has made considerable progress against human development indicators in recent years, but malnutrition resulting from poor dietary diversity and low micronutrient intakes remains entrenched. Fish is central to the Bangladeshi diet and small fish species are an important micronutrient source. Although fish consumption per capita has increased in recent years as a result of rapid expansion of aquaculture, it is likely that consumption of fish from capture fisheries (including small indigenous species particularly rich in micronutrients), has declined.

CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health

In the developing world, more than 1 billion people depend on fish for most of their animal protein, and another 1 billion people depend on livestock. Poor people, especially women and children, typically eat very little meat, milk and fish. This contributes to nutrient deficiencies and poor physical and cognitive development for children and poor health and livelihood outcomes for adults.

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