Improved management, increased culture and consumption of small fish species can improve diets of the rural poor

In many low-income countries with water resources, small fish species are important for the livelihoods, nutrition and income of the rural poor. The small size of fish favours frequent consumption by and nutrition of the rural poor, as these fish are captured, sold and bought in small quantities; used both raw and processed in traditional dishes; and are nutrient-rich. All small fish species are a rich source of animal protein, and – as they are eaten whole – have a very high content of bioavailable calcium. Some are rich in vitamin A, iron, zinc and essential fats.

Growth and survival rate of three genetic groups fed 28% and 34% protein diets

The strain by nutrition interaction in body weight and survival rate was examined by testing three genetic groups (Selection and Control lines of the GIFT strain, and Red tilapia) at two levels of protein in the diet (28% and 34%). The GIFT strain of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) has been selected for high-breeding values for body weight, whereas the Control was contemporaneously maintained and selected for breeding values of body weight close to the population mean. The Red tilapia (Oreochromis spp) was unselected at the time of the experiment.

Foods and diets of communities involved in inland aquaculture in Malaita Province, Solomon Islands

Solomon Islands has a population of just over half a million people, most of whom are rural-based subsistence farmers and fishers who rely heavily on fish as their main animal-source food and for income. The nation is one of the Pacific Island Counties and Territories; future shortfalls in fish production are projected to be serious, and government policy identifies inland aquaculture development as one of the options to meet future demand for fish.

Food and nutrition security in Timor-Leste

This report is a literature review on Food and Nutrition Security in Timor-Leste based on data from surveys conducted by the Timor-Leste National Statistics Directorate, as well as from national and international organizations working in Timor-Leste. This review was supported by the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR)-funded project “Strategy for Investment in Fisheries in East Timor”.

Fisheries and aquaculture: The importance of fish for food and nutritional security

This working paper is an attempt to distil what is known currently about the likely impacts of climate change on the commodities and natural resources that comprise the mandate of CGIAR and its 15 Centres. In this WorldFish contribution, a summary is given on the importance of fisheries and aquaculture on food nutrition and security.

Faltering fisheries and ascendant aquaculture: Implications for food and nutrition security in Bangladesh

Bangladesh has made considerable progress against human development indicators in recent years, but malnutrition resulting from poor dietary diversity and low micronutrient intakes remains entrenched. Fish is central to the Bangladeshi diet and small fish species are an important micronutrient source. Although fish consumption per capita has increased in recent years as a result of rapid expansion of aquaculture, it is likely that consumption of fish from capture fisheries (including small indigenous species particularly rich in micronutrients), has declined.

Carp-SIS polyculture: A new intervention to improve women’s livelihoods, income and nutrition in Terai, Nepal

Based on lessons learned from field trials, carp-small indigenous fish species (SIS)-prawn polyculture technology was improved to a "carp-SIS polyculture" technology suitable for small scale farmers in Terai, Nepal. In December 2008, the project was initiated to improve income and nutrition of Tharu women in Chitwan (100 farmers) and Kailali (26 farmers) districts. The present paper presents the final results of the project.

A bright future for fish farming

It is highly unlikely that wild capture fisheries will be able to produce higher yields in future. For aquaculture the opposite is the case. No other food production sector has grown as fast over the past 20 years. Aquaculture is expected to satisfy the growing world population’s demand for fish – and at the same time protect ocean fish stocks. Hopes are pinned on farming as an alternative to over-fishing. But the use of copious amounts of feed derived from wild fish, the destruction of mangrove forests and the use of antibiotics have given fish farming a bad name.

Annual report 2013/2014

Improving the productivity of fisheries and aquaculture is vital to reducing hunger and poverty for millions of people in the developing world. Today, fish provides more than one billion poor people with most of their daily animal-source protein and, globally, more than 250 million people depend directly on fisheries and aquaculture for their livelihoods; millions more are employed in fisheries and aquaculture value chains.

Training manual on improved rice-fish culture and dyke cropping

Due to lack of sufficient technical knowledge and training on improved rice-fish culture which is expanding every day, many farmers are not getting optimum results in production. World Fish Center, from the start of the CSISA-BD project took the initiative to develop guideline for improved system for rice-fish culture. It was felt that there is a lack of efficient and skilled trainers and appropriate training materials.


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