Aquaculture's unrealised potential: an ASARECA funded partnership learning programme for the fisheries sector

The potential of aquaculture to reduce poverty and hunger has been recognised in Africa. However, growth in the sector has been limited up-to-now, providing less than 2% of total fish production. In Eastern and Central Africa, the slow growth has been caused by a number of factors, including a development focus on resource poor farmers rather than small and medium enterprises, a lack of focus on the entire fish value chain (feed, seed, processing and marketing), as well as weak governance and policy environments.

Alleviating poverty through aquaculture: progress, opportunities and improvements

Significant changes in our understanding of the interrelationships between aquaculture and poverty have occurred in the last decade. In particular, there is a growing realization that the impacts of aquaculture need to be assessed from a value-chain perspective rather than through a narrow production focus. In recent years, understandings of poverty and the forms, outcomes and importance of aquaculture have also shifted. Terms in current use are first clarified, including those related to scale and location of aquaculture.

Agriculture, irrigation and poverty reduction in Cambodia: Policy narratives and ground realities compared

This report is a contribution to an assessment of the current status of agriculture in Cambodia, focusing on the linkages between agriculture and water, mainly in the form of irrigation. It seeks to view current government policies on agriculture and irrigation in the context of experiences on the ground, as communicated through the many field studies that cover varied aspects of performance in the agriculture sector and irrigation schemes.

Trade matters in the fight against poverty: narratives, perceptions, and (lack of) evidence in the case of fish trade in Africa

Two opposing views exist in the literature on the potential role that international fish trade plays in economic development. While some claim that fish trade has a pro-poor effect, others denounce the negative effect of fish export on local populations’ food security and doubt its contributions to the macro-economy. In this paper, we explore this debate in sub-Saharan Africa. Our analysis did not find any evidence of direct negative impact of fish trade on food security; neither did it find evidence that international fish trade generates positive, pro-poor outcomes.


At WorldFish, we work with an extensive network of donors and partners to create change for the millions who depend on fish in the developing world. Partnerships are essential to bring technologies and innovations to scale and achieve development impact. By 2025, WorldFish, together with our donors and partners, will improve the lives of 28 million people.

Uganda aquaculture value chains: strategic planning mission: summary report

This report presents the findings and recommendations of a strategic planning mission to reevaluate the feasibility of WorldFish implementing a fish value chain research program in Uganda under the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish (L&F). The over-arching goal of L&F is to increase productivity of small-scale livestock and fish systems so as to increase availability and affordability of meat, milk and fish for poor consumers and, in doing so, to reduce poverty through greater participation by the poor along animal source food value chains.

Stimulating investment in pearl farming in Solomon Islands: Final report

The overall objective of the project is the reduction of poverty in rural areas of Solomon Islands through creation of livelihoods based on sustainable aquaculture. This fits within the over-arching goals of the WorldFish Center in the Pacific to reduce poverty and hunger in rural communities, and with the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources (MFMR) to stimulate rural development and to develop aquaculture.

Small-scale aquaculture for rural livelihoods: Proceedings of the Symposium on Small-scale aquaculture for increasing resilience of Rural Livelihoods in Nepal. 5-6 Feb 2009. Kathmandu, Nepal

Over the years, aquaculture has developed as one of the fastest growing food production sectors in Nepal. However, local fish supplies have been extremely inadequate to meet the ever increasing demand in the country. Nepal imports substantial quantities of fish and fish products from India, Bangladesh, Thailand, and elsewhere.


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