Impact pathway analysis for research planning: the case of aquatic resources research in the WorldFish Center

In line with its mandate of poverty reduction and sustainable development, the WorldFish Center is orienting its research towards high impact scientific activity. Identifying such activities is the task of prospective impact assessment, in turn based on impact pathway analysis. The paper describes a framework for analyzing benefits from aquatic resources research, the relevant research categories, pathways to impact by category, and indicators along each pathway that can be estimated in order to quantify probable research impact.

Fisheries, nutrition and regional development pathways: reasserting food rights

As hydropower developments are accelerated, particularly along the the Mekong mainstream, debates are looming over how to address the loss of abundant fisheries that are so important to local livelihoods.The authors discuss what is at stake and what might be lost by considering how fisheries contribute to development that meets the needs of the people of Mekong. They emphasise the importance of food sovereignty as a local issue in the discourse about trade-offs in water decision-making.

Empowerment reform, yes ... but empowerment of whom? Fisheries decentralization reforms in developing countries: as critical assessment with specific reference to poverty reduction

In contrast with the previous view, which placed the State as a central element for economic development and progressive social changes, the current literature on development now advocates the role of civil society and community participation and tends to assume that decentralization has generic benefits for sustained improvements of the living standards of people. The most common argument is that decentralization is by definition a mechanism of ‘inclusion’ and ‘empowerment’.

Diagnosing, strengthening and monitoring small-scale fishery resilience

The project "Improving resilience and adaptive capacity of fisheries-dependent communities in Solomon Islands" uses participatory diagnosis to identify threats to rural coastal communities in Solomon Islands and sources of resilience. The WorldFish Center, which leads the project, defines a resilient small-scale fishery as one that absorbs stress and reorganizes itself following disturbance, while still providing benefits for poverty reduction.

Contemporary visions for small scale aquaculture

This chapter discusses the importance of small scale aquaculture in supporting livelihoods and alleviating poverty. Similar to capture fisheries, this sector faces challenges related to globalized trade, production regulation and climate variability that threaten its future. This essay considers ‘small-scale aquaculture’ (SSA) from a variety of perspectives. It first examines the origins and usage of the term and offer a definition based on the social characteristics of those who practice it.

Climate change, small-scale fisheries and smallholder aquaculture

Fisheries and aquaculture both contribute to meeting the Millennium Development Goals but vulnerability to climate change threatens the contribution that they make to development. Impacts of climate change on small-scale fisheries are of great relevance to poverty reduction. Poverty undermines the resilience of social-ecological systems such as fisheries. The majority of the world’s 250 million fisherfolk lives in areas that are highly exposed to climate change.

Climate change and fisheries: vulnerability and adaptation in Cambodia [Khmer version]

Cambodia is highly vulnerable to the effects of climate change on fisheries, which supply livelihoods for millions and up to 80% of all animal protein in the diet. Most fisheries are highly variable by nature and subject to environmental change, including climate change. Hydropower dam construction, intensified fishing pressure and macroeconomic drivers are likely to affect Cambodian fisheries more immediately and visibly than climate change.

Aquaculture development and scenarios of change in fish trade and market access for the poor in Cambodia

Aquaculture holds considerable potential to contribute to poverty alleviation, if it provides poor people with opportunities other than as primary producers. Integration of aquaculture into poverty reduction programmes provides means to diversify production systems and reduce food insecurity but also needs improved markets in locations where aquaculture can o¡er sustainable livelihoods to poor farming households. This study reviews the current constraints that poor people face in accessing markets in Cambodia and analyses its implications for pro-poor domestic aquaculture development.

Aquaculture and markets: a research agenda

This issues brief proposes an agenda for markets and trade research that supports pro-poor development of aquaculture. It summarises key trends and issues relating to global aquaculture development and identifies critical markets and trade dimensions. Coinciding with renewed interest and change in global agricultural research, this brief is targeted to aquaculture development practitioners and researchers. It aims to provoke discussion on the key areas of markets-related analysis needed to ensure that aquaculture research delivers the strongest poverty reduction and food security outcomes.

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