Traditional management systems, poverty and change in the arid zone fisheries of northern Nigeria

This paper, basd on fieldwork results, explores traditional mangement systems (TMS) in the arid zone fisheries of north-eastern Nigeria with particular reference to their impact on rural poverty. The first section provides a historical background by tracing the evolution of the TMS since the ninettenth century, with reference to government policy on fisheries management and poverty alleviation.

Trade matters in the fight against poverty: narratives, perceptions, and (lack of) evidence in the case of fish trade in Africa

Two opposing views exist in the literature on the potential role that international fish trade plays in economic development. While some claim that fish trade has a pro-poor effect, others denounce the negative effect of fish export on local populations’ food security and doubt its contributions to the macro-economy. In this paper, we explore this debate in sub-Saharan Africa. Our analysis did not find any evidence of direct negative impact of fish trade on food security; neither did it find evidence that international fish trade generates positive, pro-poor outcomes.

Spiny lobster resources and opportunity for culture in post-tsunami Aceh, Indonesia

In an effort to facilitate the restoration of livelihoods that reduce poverty and increase community resilience2 we investigated possible responses related to the pre-existing lobster fishery as well as the potential for the development of lobster culture. These activities included the compilation of biological details on local lobster populations in support of both the management of the capture fishery and future activities of puerulus collection and grow-out. Such work adds to broader efforts that include an array of habitat (e.g. mangroves) and livelihood (e.g.

Prawn postlarvae fishing in coastal Bangladesh: challenges for sustainable livelihoods

Fishing for prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) postlarvae is a major contributor to the livelihoods of the coastal poor in Bangladesh, including women. A study of coastal livelihoods along the lower Pasur River in southwest Bangladesh indicates that on average 40% of total annual income comes from postlarvae fishing during the few months involved. However, indiscriminate fishing of wild postlarvae, with high levels of by-catch, has an impact on biodiversity in coastal ecosystems. This has provoked imposition of restrictions on postlarvae collection.

Not by rent alone: analysing the pro-poor functions of small-scale fisheries in developing countries

The dominant view in academic and policy arenas is increasingly one in which the major contribution of capture fisheries to development should be derived from the capacity of society to maximise the economic rent of fishery resources. Drawing upon empirical experience from the South, this article highlights the potentially disastrous consequences that a universal implementation of the rent-maximisation model would have in developing countries, and argues that a more gradual approach would be preferable.

Immanent and interventionist inland Asian aquaculture development and its outcomes

Aquaculture is equated with the reduction of poverty by intergovernmental agencies such as the FAO, which advocate the promotion of small-scale aquaculture through project-based interventions. There is a lack of convincing empirical evidence to support the efficacy of this type of intervention, however. Meanwhile, commercial cultured freshwater fish production has increased hugely throughout Asia, despite limited direct donor or government support. Its impact with respect to poverty also remains ambiguous, however.

Fisheries, nutrition and regional development pathways: reasserting food rights

As hydropower developments are accelerated, particularly along the the Mekong mainstream, debates are looming over how to address the loss of abundant fisheries that are so important to local livelihoods.The authors discuss what is at stake and what might be lost by considering how fisheries contribute to development that meets the needs of the people of Mekong. They emphasise the importance of food sovereignty as a local issue in the discourse about trade-offs in water decision-making.

Fisheries in Zambia: an undervalued contributor to poverty reduction

This brief examines the fisheries sector in Zambia. Fisheries sector has made a small contribution (1.24%) to the country's national GDP. However, It is estimated that more than 20 percent of animal protein intake for people in Zambia is from fish. Hence there is an important role for fish and fish products in the food and nutrition security of the Zambian population, especially the urban poor and people living with HIV and AIDS (PLHIV).

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