Home > Tags > Research

Research

New report links aquaculture and poverty reduction

WorldFish working together with the Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies has exposed evidence of aquaculture's link to poverty reduction in a new report. Data gathered over a ten-year period provides important evidence for the need to invest in the sector as a way to alleviate global poverty and hunger.
 

Economic Analysis of Climate Change Adaptation

The Philippines is particularly vulnerable to climate change, as its extensive coastline is a key environmental and economic resource. Conserving ecosystems and protecting livelihoods depends to a large extent on stakeholders’ ability to predict the impact of climate change and on communities’ capacity to adapt. This study is an effort to better understand the risks associated with climate change, and assess adaptation and policy options to address these risks more effectively.

The Biorepository at ILRI: Challenges and Opportunities

Presented by Mr Absolomon Kihara, ILRI Biorepository Manager. WorldFish HQ, Penang, Malaysia, 23 Oct 2014. There is a scientific and ethical imperative to make the maximum use of biological samples which have been obtained, often at a significant expense.
Thursday, October 23, 2014

Gender-equity or gender-equality scales and indices for potential use in aquatic agricultural systems

This report summarizes existing gender equality/equity scales or indices found in a review of the literature, conducted to inform the design and evaluation of a communication intervention to generate community-based, gender-transformative action in agricultural or aquatic agricultural systems (AAS). It is anticipated that findings from this report will contribute to a comprehensive research design to test the effects of gender transformative interventions beyond this single intervention.
 

Capacity to innovate from a system CGIAR research program perspective

The three system CGIAR research programs on Integrated Systems for the Humid Tropics, Dryland Systems and Aquatic Agricultural Systems have included “capacity to innovate” as an intermediate development outcome in their respective theories of change. The wording of the intermediate development outcome is “increased systems capacity to innovate and contribute to improved livelihoods of low-income agricultural communities.” This note captures the authors' collective thinking about this intermediate development outcome from a systems perspective to clarify it and inspire other programs.
 

Aquaculture and food security, poverty alleviation and nutrition in Ghana: Case study prepared for the Aquaculture for Food Security, Poverty Alleviation and Nutrition project

This study provides an overview of the aquaculture sector in Ghana. It assesses the actual and potential contribution of aquaculture to poverty reduction and food security, and identifies enabling conditions for and drivers of the development of Ghana’s aquaculture sector. The study uses data collected from a variety of primary and secondary sources, including key informant interviews with actors within the aquaculture sector and relevant secondary literature.

Collaborating for resilience: conflict, collective action, and transformation on Cambodia’s Tonle Sap Lake

Tha authors report on outcomes and lessons learned from a 15-month initiative in Cambodia’s Tonle Sap Lake. Employing the appreciation-influence-control (AIC) model of participatory stakeholder engagement, the initiative built shared understanding of the sources of vulnerability in fisheries livelihoods and catalyzed collective action to support resilience in this valuable and productive social-ecological system. Outcomes include the transfer of a large, commercial fishing concession to community access, and resolution of a boundary dispute involving community fishery organizations in neighboring provinces. Motivated by these successes, the main national grassroots network representing fishing communities also modified its internal governance and strategy of engagement to emphasize constructive links with government and the formal NGO sector. The AIC approach provides an effective route to enable collective action in ways that strengthen dialogue and collaboration across scales, fostering the conditions for local-level transformations that can contribute to improvement in governance. We conclude with a discussion of the broader implications for resilience practice.
 

Pages

Subscribe to Research