Smallholder farmers in Malawi adopt and improve technologies from collaborative research

Details are given of the various new technologies demonstrated by ICLARM and the Fisheries Department in Malawito smallholder farmers, which include the following: 1) Use of Pennisetum purpureum as an alternative/supplement to maize bran as fish feed; (2) Creation of high quality compost from poor quality plant wastes as fish food or fertilizer; 3) Vegetable-pond integration using pond sediments and water for adjacent vegetable beds; 4) Integration of chicken and fish enterprises; 5) Pond stirring with a bamboo rake for lifting nutrients from the pond bottom into the water column; 6) Use of

Resilience and social thresholds in small-scale fishing communities

Change has become a pervasive global force with implications for the sustainability of social–ecological systems. In this context, understanding how much disturbance systems can absorb, where critical thresholds lie, and what systems might look like if a threshold is crossed are critical research questions. This paper explores resilience and social thresholds in two coastal communities in Mozambique by having fishers define their system identity, identify potential system thresholds, and explain how they would respond to crossing a threshold.

Research in development: the approach of AAS

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) is pursuing a Research in Development approach that emphasizes the importance of embedding research in the development context. Reflecting this emphasis the six elements of this approach are a commitment to people and place, participatory action research, gender transformative research, learning and networking, partnerships, and capacity building. It is through the careful pursuit of these six elements that we believe that the program will achieve the development outcomes we aspire to, and do so at scale.

Promising practices in food security and nutrition assistance to vulnerable households in the Tonle Sap Region, Cambodia

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) seeks to reduce poverty and improve food security for many small-scale fishers and farmers who are dependent on aquatic agriculture systems by partnering with local, national and international partners to achieve large-scale development impact. This study on promising practices in food security and nutrition assistance to vulnerable households in the Tonle Sap region forms part of the preliminary research that informs AAS work in the highly productive Mekong Delta and Tonle Sap Lake floodplain.

Population dynamics of Nemipterus japonicus from the northern Arabian Sea, Pakistan

Catch-per-effort and length-frequency data on threadfin bream Nemipterus japonicus (Nemipteridae) supplied by the staff of the R/V Dr. Fridtjof Nansen, covering the period September 1983 to June 1984, were analyzed using the NANPACK and Compleat ELEFAN softwares. The seasonal, zonal and depth-wise distribution of N. japonicus is presented and discussed and the growth parameters L8 and K that were estimated are compared with estimates from other areas of the Indo-Pacific.

Participatory action research on climate risk management, Bangladesh

The rural populations of southern Bangladesh are some of the most vulnerable communities in the world to the future impacts of climate change. They are particularly at risk from floods, waterlogged soils, and increasing salinity of both land and water. The objective of this project was to analyze the vulnerability of people in four villages that are experiencing different levels of soil salinity.

Nearshore fish aggregating devices (FADs) for food security in Solomon Islands

Coastal fisheries are central to the lives of rural Solomon Island villages, supplying daily food and serving as one of the few sources of income. Yet, it is predicted that coastal fisheries in Solomon Islands, like many countries in the Pacific region, will not be able to provide enough fish to meet peoples’ needs by 2030. Proposed strategies to prevent this scenario include improving the management of coastal fisheries and diversifying sources of fish by enhancing access to other fishes, either through aquaculture or the use of fish aggregating devices (FAD).

Multivariate models of tilapia and carp growth as an application of microcomputers in aquaculture research

An examination is made of the applications of microcomputers to aquaculture research, considering in particular data storage and processing and also statistical analysis programmes. Reference is made to development projects with the aim of making use of modern, applied research methods to develop aquaculture technologies applicable for developing countries.

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