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Resilience

Economic Analysis of Climate Change Adaptation

The Philippines is particularly vulnerable to climate change, as its extensive coastline is a key environmental and economic resource. Conserving ecosystems and protecting livelihoods depends to a large extent on stakeholders’ ability to predict the impact of climate change and on communities’ capacity to adapt. This study is an effort to better understand the risks associated with climate change, and assess adaptation and policy options to address these risks more effectively.

Case study: Building resilient community fisheries in Cambodia

Tonle Sap is the largest lake in Southeast Asia and one of the most productive freshwater fisheries in the world. Fish from Tonle Sap provide an essential source of protein and micronutrients, critical to the health of families in Cambodia, a country still plagued by high rates of childhood malnutrition. Managing water resources for food and income also means harnessing the full value of these fisheries for local communities.

Resilient livelihoods and food security in coastal aquatic agricultural systems: Investing in transformational change

Aquatic agricultural systems (AAS) are diverse production and livelihood systems where families cultivate a range of crops, raise livestock, farm or catch fish, gather fruits and other tree crops, and harness natural resources such as timber, reeds, and wildlife. Aquatic agricultural systems occur along freshwater floodplains, coastal deltas, and inshore marine waters, and are characterized by dependence on seasonal changes in productivity, driven by seasonal variation in rainfall, river flow, and/or coastal and marine processes. Despite this natural productivity, the farming, fishing, and herding communities who live in these systems are among the poorest and most vulnerable in their countries and regions. This report provides an overview of the scale and scope of development challenges in coastal aquatic agricultural systems, their significance for poor and vulnerable communities, and the opportunities for partnership and investment that support efforts of these communities to secure resilient livelihoods in the face of multiple risks.

Boosting nutrition and livelihoods in Zambia through the chisense fishery

For the people of Zambia, especially the poor, fish is the most important and sometimes only source of animal protein and other essential nutrients. However, the per capita supply of fish today is only half of what it was 30 years ago, due to stagnating production, growing populations and increasingly competitive trade. Projections for future supplies are that fish will become increasingly expensive also in Zambia. Currently Zambian households in most parts of the country spend more money on fish than on any other food item, including staple foods and other animal products. If this trend continues, there are concerns that fish may slip out of the reach of the poor – with far-reaching implications for national nutrition security and public health.

African aquaculture: development beyond the fish farm

Despite global hunger declining, the number of people going hungry in Africa remains high with 30% of people reported to be undernourished in 2010. Fish are an important source of food for many African people, providing around 18% of their animal protein, but with a growing and rapidly urbanizing population and capture fisheries largely reaching their limit, many African countries are now looking towards aquaculture to supply an increasing demand for fish.
 

Assessing the economic value of coral reefs to Solomon Island communities

Coastal communities in Solomon Islands, like many island countries, rely heavily on their coral reef resources for subsistence and income generation. These reefs, similar to others throughout the world are under pressure from human induced impacts and over harvesting. In Solomon Islands, a growing demand for coral for the international aquarium and curio trade, as well as a local demand for betel nut lime (made from live coral) further intensifies stress on the reefs. The collection of coral for these activities can result in the removal of specific coral types, and localised destruction of the reef habitat. This in turn can have major ecological impacts on other reef dependent species like fish and invertebrates. The degradation of the reef can affect the resilience of the whole ecosystem, and its ability to recover from both natural and anthropogenic impacts. A damaged reef system may also lead to negative socio-economic flow-on effects to the communities’ dependant on them.

Building Resilient Community Fisheries in the Tonle Sap Lake, Cambodia

We had failed several times before, and many people thought it wasn’t worth trying more, but we decided we had to,” says Om Meng, the leader of a community fishery in the floating village of Phat Sanday, on Cambodia’s Tonle Sap Lake.  “Our livelihoods depend on having a place to fish…”

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