Trophic model of the coastal fisheries ecosystem of the west coast of peninsular Malaysia

A preliminary mass-balance trophic model was constructed for the coastal fisheries ecosystem of the West Coast of Peninsular Malaysia (0 - 120 m depth). The ecosystem was partitioned into 15 trophic groups, and biomasses for selected groups were obtained from research (trawl) surveys conducted in the area in 1987 and 1991. Trophic interactions of the groups are presented. The network analysis indicates that fishing fleets for demersal fishes and prawns have a major direct or indirect impact on most high-trophic level groups in the ecosystem.

Status of the demersal fishery resources of Bangladesh

The present study makes use of the fisheries survey data collected during the period 1984 - 87 by the multi-purpose research vessel RV Anusandhani in the waters of Bangladesh, Bay of Bengal. The data consists of twelve survey cruises directed at the shrimp resources (1985 - 87) and nineteen survey cruises directed at the demersal fish resources (1984 - 86). The biomasses for shrimp and demersal fish during the survey period were estimated, along with a detailed analysis of biomass distribution by depth zone and catch rates for important species of shrimp and demersal fish species.

Socioeconomic and bioeconomic analysis of coastal resources in central and northern Java, Indonesia

Indonesia’s fisheries exports rose from 2 206 t in 1970 to 598 385 t in 1996 with a subsequent export value rise from US$0.69 billion to US$1.78 billion. The surplus in the balance of trade (BOT) was US$1.59 billion in 1996. The fisheries exports were predominantly shrimp, tuna, skipjack and demersal fishes. Large scale fisheries operations are prevalent in the Java Sea. The dominant fishing gear is hook-and-line (40%), gillnet (31%), traps (10%), seine net and lift-net (6%), purse seine (1%), shrimp net with BED (0.04%) and others (6%). The large scale fisheries e.g.

Shrimp (Penaeus monodon) farming in the coastal areas of Bangladesh: Challenges and prospects towards sustainable development

This chapter mainly presents the history of shrimp aquaculture in Bangladesh and impacts of shrimp farming on rural livelihoods with particular focus on income and dietary consumption, based on literature reviews and structured field surveys. The chapter also focuses on the complexities of land use patterns and recommends a holistic approach to adopt integrated zoning principles into national policies to sustain shrimp farming in Bangladesh.

Rice-fish integration for high saline, coastal areas of Bangladesh: Learning from the Challenge Program for Water and Food (CPWF)

The Southwestern coastal zone of Bangladesh is agro-based and one of the world’s most populous, poverty-stricken and food-insecure regions, with high vulnerability to climate change. Shrimp aquaculture rapidly expanded in this tidal floodplain but shrimp is highly susceptible to disease, has less contribution in local consumption, and its profitability depends on international market prices, leading the demand for improving the farming system.

Reduction in effort and favorable environment helped to increase shrimp catch in Kuwait

The 1988-1989 shrimp catch from kuwait waters was 5125 t, representing a 62% increase above the previous record of 3158 t in 1966-1967. Ninety-eight per cent of the record landing was comprised of Penaeus semisulcatus (Penaeidae). The attainment of optimal spawning-stock biomass by reduction in effort, protection of small recruits through delayed season opening, as well as strict enforcement of closed nursery areas, and occurrence of two strong recruitment pulses due to favorable environmental conditions in 1988 appear to be the major reasons for the increase.

Preliminary analysis of demersal fish assemblages in coastal waters of the Gulf of Thailand

The 1995 trawl data of the research vessels Pramong 2 and 9 in the Gulf of Thailand were analyzed using TWINSPAN and DCA. Four main station clusters were identified related to geographic location and depth. Two clusters are associated with shallow water areas and the other two clusters are found in deeper areas with water depths > 30 m. Temporal analysis indicates clustering of monthly data into wet and dry seasons. Examination of species abundance data indicates that the seasonality may not be very pronounced.

An overview of the socioeconomic status of fisheries in Malaysia

Fish production in Malaysia increased steadily at 4.5% per annum from 801 000 t in 1985 to 1 280 906 t in 1997. Most of the production was contributed by marine capture fisheries, amounting to 1 168 973 t (91% of total production) in 1997, while the rest (132 700 t or 8%) came from inland fisheries and aquaculture. About 72% of the marine landings, or 837 574 t, were from Peninsular Malaysia while the rest were from the states of Sabah, Sarawak, and the Federal Territory Labuan.

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