Improved management, increased culture and consumption of small fish species can improve diets of the rural poor

In many low-income countries with water resources, small fish species are important for the livelihoods, nutrition and income of the rural poor. The small size of fish favours frequent consumption by and nutrition of the rural poor, as these fish are captured, sold and bought in small quantities; used both raw and processed in traditional dishes; and are nutrient-rich. All small fish species are a rich source of animal protein, and – as they are eaten whole – have a very high content of bioavailable calcium. Some are rich in vitamin A, iron, zinc and essential fats.

The ICLARM -IFDR multidisciplinary study of small-scale fisheries of San Miguel Bay, Philippines.

Recent attempts to improve the income levels of municipal fishermen in the Philippines have included a veriety offinancing schemes, the formation of associations and cooperatives and extension work by the Bureau of Fisheriesand Aquatic Resources. Work currently being carried out in the San Miguel Bay area is outlined.

Governance structures and sustainability in Indian Ocean sea cucumber fisheries

Good governance is paramount to the sustainability of fisheries, and inclusiveness of stakeholder groups has become the centerpiece in the ethos of managing small-scale fisheries. Understanding the effect of governance network structures on fishery sustainability can help guide governance to achieve desired outcomes. In the present study, the fishery context and governance structure of sea cucumber fisheries in the Indian Ocean were evaluated.

A framework to assess national level vulnerability from the perspective of food security: The case of coral reef fisheries

Measuring the vulnerability of human populations to environmental change is increasingly being used to develop appropriate adaptation policies and management plans for different economic sectors. We developed a national-level vulnerability index that is specific to food security policies by measuring nations’ relative vulnerabilities to a decline in their coral reef fisheries. Coral reef fisheries are expected to decline with climate and anthropogenic disturbances, which may have significant consequences for food security.

Fishing dynamics associated with periodically harvested marine closures

Periodically-harvested fisheries closures are emerging as a socially acceptable and locally implementable way to balance concerns about conserving ecosystem function and sustaining livelihoods. Across the Indo-Pacific periodically-harvested closures are commonly employed, yet their contribution towards more sustainable fisheries remains largely untested in the social and ecological context of tropical small-scale fisheries.

Fish for the future: Fisheries development and food security for Kiribati in an era of global climate change

The Republic of Kiribati is a vast South Pacific island group with one of the largest exclusive economic zones (EEZs) in the world. Kiribati waters support a wealth of marine fisheries activities. These activities occur in oceanic, coastal and inshore environments and range from large, foreign, industrial-scale oceanic fishing operations to small-scale, domestic, inshore subsistence fisheries, aquaculture and recreational fisheries.

Ecosystem approach to small scale tropical marine fisheries: Tanzania

Throughout the world, poor fisheries management contributes to resource degradation, poverty, and food insecurity. This European Union project on an Ecosystem Approach to Small-scale Tropical Marine Fisheries is led by WorldFish and implemented in collaboration with national partners in Indonesia, the Philippines, the Solomon Islands and Tanzania. The overall objective is to use an ecosystem approach to fisheries management (EAFM) to improve governance of small-scale fisheries (SSF).

Development and management of artisanal fishery for yellow clam Mesodesma mactroides in Uruguay

A description is given of the artisanal fishery for yellow clam (Mesodesma mactroides ) conducted on beaches between the resorts of La Coronilla and Barra de Chuy, Uruguay. The clams are gathered by means of simple implements such as shovels, put in bags and kept in nearby storehouses after they have been checked for weight and size control.

Coral reef longline: an alternative gear for small-scale fishermen?

In analyzing the structure of small scale fisheries in West Sumatra waters the need was found for diversification of current fishing gear. Trials were conducted using a coral reef longline as an alternative gear; using different kinds of baits and operating in different depths, the coral reef longline can be adjusted to select mainly mature fish, but proper identification of species is of importance in determining size at maturity.


Subscribe to RSS - Small-scale fisheries