Lake Nasser fisheries: Recommendations for management, including monitoring and stock assessment

This study sought to improve the baseline knowledge of the fisheries of Lake Nasser and to make recommendations for the improved management of the fisheries, including stock assessment. The study included the review of key literature, visits to fisheries infrastructure and fishing camps, and individual consultations with the key stakeholders by means of semi-structured interviews, as well as a collective stakeholder consultation workshop. A preliminary stock assessment was also undertaken using the most recent time series of catch and effort estimates.

Increasing productivity and improving livelihoods in aquatic agricultural systems: A review of interventions

Aquatic agricultural systems (AAS) are food production systems in which the productivity of freshwater or coastal ecosystems contributes significantly to total household nutrition, food security, and income in developing countries. The Consultative Group of International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) engages in research in development to address this challenge.

Inclusive aquaculture: business at the bottom of the aquatic pyramid

Through a SIDA -funded project on small-scale fisheries FAO and partners have been supporting WorldFish Center research into small-scale aquaculture investment. Studies of projects in Bangladesh, India and Indonesia suggest significant outcomes from investment, and start to show the potential for new avenues for investment in aquaculture that have potential to deliver not only aquaculture products and profitable businesses for smallholders, but also social and economic goals. Some of the highlights are provided in this article.

Improvement of the socioeconomic condition of women in small-scale fishing communities

The Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific was founded in 1947 under the United Nations charter to encourage the economic and social development of Asia and the Far East. ESCAP has concentrated its efforts in six priority areas: food and agriculture; energy; raw materials and commodities; transfer of technology; international trade, transnational corporations and external financial resources transfers; and integrated rural development. Chief of ESCAP's Agriculture Division, Sultan Z. Khan, kindly supplied this report on a current fisheries-related project.

Fishing dynamics associated with periodically harvested marine closures

Periodically-harvested fisheries closures are emerging as a socially acceptable and locally implementable way to balance concerns about conserving ecosystem function and sustaining livelihoods. Across the Indo-Pacific periodically-harvested closures are commonly employed, yet their contribution towards more sustainable fisheries remains largely untested in the social and ecological context of tropical small-scale fisheries.

Fish for the future: Fisheries development and food security for Kiribati in an era of global climate change

The Republic of Kiribati is a vast South Pacific island group with one of the largest exclusive economic zones (EEZs) in the world. Kiribati waters support a wealth of marine fisheries activities. These activities occur in oceanic, coastal and inshore environments and range from large, foreign, industrial-scale oceanic fishing operations to small-scale, domestic, inshore subsistence fisheries, aquaculture and recreational fisheries.

Ecosystem approach to small scale tropical marine fisheries: Tanzania

Throughout the world, poor fisheries management contributes to resource degradation, poverty, and food insecurity. This European Union project on an Ecosystem Approach to Small-scale Tropical Marine Fisheries is led by WorldFish and implemented in collaboration with national partners in Indonesia, the Philippines, the Solomon Islands and Tanzania. The overall objective is to use an ecosystem approach to fisheries management (EAFM) to improve governance of small-scale fisheries (SSF).

An ecosystem approach to small-scale fisheries through participatory diagnosis in four tropical countries

Participatory diagnosis is an approach to identify, prioritize and mobilise around factors that constrain or enable effective governance and management in small-scale fisheries. Diagnostic frameworks are mostly designed and used for systematic scientific analysis or impact evaluation. Through participation they also have potential to guide contextually informed improvements to management in practice, including transitions to contemporary forms of governance like the ecosystem approach to fisheries (EAF).

Design and implementation of fishery modules in integrated household surveys in developing countries

Fish and other aquatic animals contribute to the food security of citizens of developing countries, both as a source of income and as a component of healthy diets, yet fishing is not currently captured in most integrated household surveys. This sourcebook provides essential technical guidance on the design of statistical modules and questionnaires aimed at collecting fishery data at the household level.

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