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Small-Scale Fisheries

Timor-Leste Coastal Communities Adapt to Climate Change

Emerging as an independent nation in 2002 after decades of unrest, Timor-Leste faces many development challenges.

Fisheries policies for a new era

There is a growing recognition that the fisheries policies of the past have been driven primarily by environmental and economic research agendas. This may have been due to the influence of the more powerful actors in the fisheries policy debate: foreign governments, conservation organizations, the scientific establishment, development bodies, and finance institutions.

Healthy links: assessing food safety throughout the value chain

Putting enough food on the table is a daily challenge faced by households around the world. Ensuring that the food contains enough protein and essential micronutrients is a further consideration, and animal products, such as fish and meat from livestock can go a long way to improving the diets of the world’s poor. In addition, small-scale production of animal source foods can be a pathway out of poverty for many communities.
 

Small-scale fisheries through the wellbeing lens

Despite longstanding recognition that small-scale fisheries make multiple contributions to economies, societies and cultures, assessing these contributions and incorporating them into policy and decision-making has suffered from a lack of a comprehensive integrating ‘lens’.

Profitability of small-scale fisheries in Elmina, Ghana

Profitability of small-scale fisheries in Elmina, Ghana
Aheto, D.W. ; Asare, N.K. ; Tenkorang, E.Y. ; Asare, C. ; Okyere, I. Sustainability 4(11): 2785-2794 2012
In order to achieve sustainable fishing livelihoods in coastal communities, data on profitability of small-scale fisheries relative to fish species caught and gear types used by fishermen is required as part of a broader fisheries management strategy. This study was undertaken with this in mind. Interviews were conducted among 60 fishermen between February and March 2010. Economic assessment of small-scale fishing activities were done using questionnaires based on direct market pricing and contingent valuation methods. The results indicate that highly profitable fish species include Epinephelus aeneus, Sparus caeruleostictus, Dentex angolensis and Lutjanus goreensis valued at US$2.97, US$2.87, US$2.85 and US$2.63 per kilogram respectively. The less profitable species include Dasyatis margarita, Caranx crysos and Sardinella aurita valued at US$0.34, US$0.66 and US$ 0.85 per kilogram respectively. Although Sardinella aurita was among the less valuable fish species, it was the main species driving profits for the fishermen due to its high share volume among the fish catches. Findings from this study suggest high rates of exploitation, in that stocks generally cannot provide for increased economic return in the face of increased investment. This is a clear indicator that the open-access nature of Ghanaian fisheries is not sustainable, and management reform is well overdue. Read the full text.

The private sector: partnering for poverty relief and profit

Addressing the problems of poverty and malnutrition in low-income communities is usually the preserve of government agencies and development organizations. However, with demand for fish products soaring worldwide, the small-scale fisheries sector in developing nations represents a potentially lucrative – as well as ethical – opportunity for private sector investors. WorldFish has formed partnerships with a number of private sector partners to create a win–win scenario for business and local communities alike.

Podcast: Stephen Hall's expectations of GCARD 2012

Dr. Stephen Hall speaks to us from GCARD and his expectations of the conference; partnership, thinking with small-holder famers and gender issues for agricultural development.

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