Catch rates, composition and fish size from reefs managed with periodically-harvested closures

Periodically-harvested closures are commonly employed within co-management frameworks to help manage small-scale, multi-species fisheries in the Indo-Pacific. Despite their widespread use, the benefits of periodic harvesting strategies for multi-species fisheries have, to date, been largely untested. We examine catch and effort data from four periodically-harvested reef areas and 55 continuously-fished reefs in Solomon Islands.

Bringing gender analysis and resilience analysis together in small scale fisheries research: Challenges and opportunities

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the challenges involved in bringing gender analysis together with the analysis of social-ecological resilience and in doing so to provide ways forward that will enable a more meaningful account of gendered social relations in relation to resilience. The co-authors comprise researchers working in the field of gender as well as those working in the field of resilience reflecting our aim to promote constructive collaboration between the fields.

After Sinarapan: the planned small-scale fish cage industry of Lake Buhi

The cage culture of tilapia in Lake Buhi is described. The industry was set up in June 1979 following theexhaustion of the sinarapan fishery of the lake. The successful growth of the industry, together with the problems involved and their solution is discussed. Future prospects and management of the industry are also considered

The WorldFish Center: Malawi

The role of the WorldFish Center is to research and disseminate appropriate aquaculture and fisheries technologies for sustainable agricultural intensification. To achieve these goals the WorldFish Center works in partnership with the government of Malawi. It leverages success by collaborating with both local and overseas academic research organizations, drawing funding from the global development community.

Vulnerability in African small-scale fishing communities

Fishing communities are often recognised as being amongst the poorest in developing countries, and interventions targeted at improving resource status seen as central in the fight against poverty. A series of field assessments focusing on vulnerability conducted in two communities in Mali and Nigeria revealed some counterintuitive results. Despite fishing being the primary livelihood, vulnerabilities relating directly to the state of the resource were ranked lower than those relating to basic human needs.

Traditional fisheries development in the Philippines.

Development programmes aimed at raising income levels of the half-million Philippine traditional municipal fishermen have emphasized production-oriented projects designed to up-grade vessels and gear. Review of recent biological, technical, and socio-economic research provides evidence that technology-based efforts have generally not been successful, and that the coastal resources fished by municipal fishermen are not as extensive as previously supposed.

Technical guidelines for economic valuation of inland small-scale fisheries in developing countries

These “Technical Guidelines for Economic Valuation of Inland Small-scale Fisheries in Developing Countries” are one of the outputs of the project on “Food security and poverty alleviation through improved valuation and governance of river fisheries in Africa”. The guidelines draw upon research results and experience gained during the course of the project.

The status of routine fishery data collection in Southeast Asia, central America, the South Pacific, and West Africa, with special reference to small-scale fisheries

The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) strategy for improving information on the status and trends of capture fisheries (FAO Strategy STF) was endorsed by Member States and the UN General Assembly in 2003. Its overall objective is to provide a framework, strategy, and plan to improve knowledge and understanding of the status and trends of fisheries as a basis for policy-making and management, towards conservation and sustainable use of resources within ecosystems.

Social and economic aspects of small-scale fisheries development: a case study from Malaysia

Natural, technological, and human resources interact systematically and it is argued that development strategies for small-scale fisheries must take this into consideration. Two general approaches to development are discussed. The first, a production-oriented approach frequently depending on capital-intensive technical innovations, threatens to produce new or exacerbate existing inequalities among fishermen, with potentially disruptive social conse-quences. The second type of approach is to increase the efficiency with which the existing catch is handled, processed, and marketed.

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