Inland community fisheries in southern Laos

Since 1993, a series of aquatic resource co-management workshops have been on-going, established by the Lao government and fisheries agencies for village farmers in the Khong District in southern Laos, aiming for a sustainable use of inland capture fisheries resources. This article describes the mechanics involved and the participants' perspective, as well as reporting the outcomes and progress of the workshops so far.

Implementing resilience management: lessons from fishing communities in the Niger basin

Small inland fisheries are important to the livelihoods of the poor in Africa, contributing both food security and income to millions of households living near freshwater lakes, reservoirs, rivers and floodplains. These inland fisheries have complex exploitation systems with large numbers of fishers operating in the informal sector. These systems are highly vulnerable to external disturbance, making them extremely difficult to assess and manage.

The future is now: how scenarios can help Senegalese and Mauritanian fisheries adapt to climate change

Localized changes in the productivity of marine and inland waters induced by climate change will pose new challenges to the fishery and the aquaculture sectors in West Africa. However, climate change does not occur in isolation of other drivers of change: processes of environmental, economic and social change can affect the fishery sector, potentially creating additional vulnerability to climate change. Scenarios are a useful tool to explore uncertainties and understand non-climatic drivers of change.

Fish supply and food security for Africa

Fish is an important food for over 400 million Africans, contributing essential proteins, minerals and micronutrients to their diets. Paradoxically, despite the high dependence on fish as a source of animal protein, fish consumption in sub-Saharan Africa is the world's lowest. The continent is projected to need an additional 1.6 million tons of fish a year by 2015 just to maintain current consumption.

Empowerment reform, yes ... but empowerment of whom? Fisheries decentralization reforms in developing countries: as critical assessment with specific reference to poverty reduction

In contrast with the previous view, which placed the State as a central element for economic development and progressive social changes, the current literature on development now advocates the role of civil society and community participation and tends to assume that decentralization has generic benefits for sustained improvements of the living standards of people. The most common argument is that decentralization is by definition a mechanism of ‘inclusion’ and ‘empowerment’.

Diagnosis and the management constituency of small-scale fisheries

Diagnosis and adaptive management can help improve the ability of small-scale fisheries (SSF) in the developing world to better cope with and adapt to both external drivers and internal sources of uncertainty. This paper presents a framework for diagnosis and adaptive management and discusses ways of implementing the first two phases of learning: diagnosis and mobilising an appropriate management constituency. The discussion addresses key issues and suggests suitable approaches and tools as well as numerous sources of further information.

The contribution of fish intake, aquaculture, and small-scale fisheries to improving nutrition: A literature review

Much of fish consumed by the poor are caught by household members and traded in local markets. These fish are rarely or poorly included in national statistics, and it is therefore difficult to estimate precisely the real contribution of fish to the rural poor households. This report is the first global overview of the role played by fish in improving nutrition. Fish consumption patterns of the poor, the nutritional value of fish, and small-scale fisheries and aquaculture activities are considered. It also highlights the gap in knowledge where more research is needed.

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