The contribution of nearshore fish aggregating devices (FADs) to food security and livelihoods in Solomon Islands

Fish aggregating devices, or FADs, are used widely in developing countries to concentrate pelagic fish, making them easier to catch. Nearshore FADs anchored close to the coast allow access for rural communities, but despite their popularity among policy makers, there is a dearth of empirical analysis of their contributions to the supply of fish and to fisheries management. In this paper the authors demonstrate that nearshore FADs increased the supply of fish to four communities in Solomon Islands.

Catch rates, composition and fish size from reefs managed with periodically-harvested closures

Periodically-harvested closures are commonly employed within co-management frameworks to help manage small-scale, multi-species fisheries in the Indo-Pacific. Despite their widespread use, the benefits of periodic harvesting strategies for multi-species fisheries have, to date, been largely untested. We examine catch and effort data from four periodically-harvested reef areas and 55 continuously-fished reefs in Solomon Islands.

Aquaculture and food security, poverty alleviation and nutrition in Ghana: Case study prepared for the Aquaculture for Food Security, Poverty Alleviation and Nutrition project

This study provides an overview of the aquaculture sector in Ghana. It assesses the actual and potential contribution of aquaculture to poverty reduction and food security, and identifies enabling conditions for and drivers of the development of Ghana’s aquaculture sector. The study uses data collected from a variety of primary and secondary sources, including key informant interviews with actors within the aquaculture sector and relevant secondary literature.

The WorldFish Center: Malawi

The role of the WorldFish Center is to research and disseminate appropriate aquaculture and fisheries technologies for sustainable agricultural intensification. To achieve these goals the WorldFish Center works in partnership with the government of Malawi. It leverages success by collaborating with both local and overseas academic research organizations, drawing funding from the global development community.

A traditional floodplain fishery of the lower Amazon River, Brasil.

This paper describes fishing activities of households in four communities located in a floodplain lake system of the lower Amazon river. An average of 42 households were interviewed about their fishing activity on a monthly basis. The fishery is a typical multi-gear, multi-specific artisanal fishery. Approximately ten types of fishing gear are utilized, of which the three main types of gillnets account for 51% of the total catch. The catch per trip averaged 15 kg, for an annual total of 2,295 kg per household.

The small-scale pelagic and demersal fisheries off Kribi, Cameroon

A description of the small-scale fisheries of the coastal pelagic and demersal resources off Kribi, Cameroon, is presented. The major fishing grounds are within the estuarine zone, an area of high productivity. Catch estimates of 19.5 t year super(-1) and 6.5 t year super(-1) were obtained for the pelagic motorized and nonmotorized canoes, respectively, while estimates of 11 t year super(-1) were obtained for the demersal motorized canoes. The social benefits from these fisheries are also discussed.

Rights-based fisheries governance: from fishing rights to human rights

In the last twenty years, policy prescriptions for addressing the global crisis in fisheries have centred on strengthening fisheries governance through clarifying exclusive individual or community rights of access to fishery resources. With a focus on small-scale developing country fisheries in particular, we argue that basing the case for fishery governance reform on assumed economic incentives for resource stewardship is insufficient when there are other sources of insecurity in people's lives that are unrelated to the state of fishery resources.

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