Aquaculture and food security, poverty alleviation and nutrition in Ghana: Case study prepared for the Aquaculture for Food Security, Poverty Alleviation and Nutrition project

This study provides an overview of the aquaculture sector in Ghana. It assesses the actual and potential contribution of aquaculture to poverty reduction and food security, and identifies enabling conditions for and drivers of the development of Ghana’s aquaculture sector. The study uses data collected from a variety of primary and secondary sources, including key informant interviews with actors within the aquaculture sector and relevant secondary literature.

Water, poverty and inland fisheries: lessons from Africa and Asia

Relying on experience from West Africa and the Mekong Basin, the authors contend that small-scale inland fisheries are a critical element in the livelihoods of many farming households who live near water bodies in developing countries. Empirical evidence suggests that the relation between poverty and small-scale fisheries cannot be reduced to a simple correlation with income. A more thorough analysis is required.

Une étude des produits halieutiques de faible valeur commercialisés dans la région du Lac Victoria

L’essor de la pêche commerciale, notamment de l’exportation de la perche du Nil, a entraîné la réduction des stocks de poissons et de la disponibilité du poisson auprès des populations de la région du Lac Victoria. Cette baisse ne menace pas seulement les moyens d’existence des pêcheurs artisanaux et des transformateurs mais elle met également en danger la sécurité nutritionnelle et alimentaire des populations de la région.

Trading fish for sex in sub-Saharan Africa

Chris Béné's article "Women and Fish-for-Sex" (FFS) is being highlighted in this issue of id21. The researchers use the example of a small-scale fishing community in the Kafue flats region of Zambia, and review other cases in the world. They demonstrate how economic impoverishment, which is often put forward to explain FFS transactions, is too simplistic to capture the complexity of the FFS phenomenon.

Simulating fisheries for the assessment of optimum harvesting strategies.

Some results of a line of research explored by the author in recent years, and concerning the small-scale fisheries of Mexico are discussed. Clarity of goals for fisheries management is stressed as a departure point before taking any step towards model building. Age-structured simulation models require input data and parameters such as growth rates, natural mortality, age at first capture and maturity, longevity, the longest possible catch records series, and estimates of numbers caught per age group.

Seaweed farming as alternative income for small-scale fishermen: a case study

If access to a fully exploited fishery resources remains open, the development of alternative or supplementary income sources offers the best hope for raising incomes in fishing communities. This paper presents a case study which examines the transition of Hingotanan, Philippines from an almost exclusive dependence upon capture fishing to an extensive involvement in seaweed (Eucheuma spinosum) farming. The paper also attempts to demonstrate the likely socio-economic impact of profitable income alternatives initiated by the private sector in an essentially free enterprise setting.

The potential role of small fish species in improving micronutrient deficiencies in developing countries: building evidence

The purpose of this study was to build a comprehensive overview of the potential role of fish in improving nutrition with respect to certain micronutrient deficiencies in developing countries. A comprehensive literature review was completed. The quality of the data was carefully reviewed and data that lacked proper information on methods, units or sample size were excluded. Particular effort was made to highlight not only the information recently generated but also the gap in knowledge where more research is needed.

Not by rent alone: analysing the pro-poor functions of small-scale fisheries in developing countries

The dominant view in academic and policy arenas is increasingly one in which the major contribution of capture fisheries to development should be derived from the capacity of society to maximise the economic rent of fishery resources. Drawing upon empirical experience from the South, this article highlights the potentially disastrous consequences that a universal implementation of the rent-maximisation model would have in developing countries, and argues that a more gradual approach would be preferable.

The marine fisheries of Trinidad and Tobago.

The marine fisheries of Trinidad and Tobago are mainly artisanal and involve about 8,000 fishers. The main fishing gear used are the gillnets, the troll, the shrimp trawl, the fishpot and the industrial longline. Landings total approximately 14,000 t annually with Scomberomorus brasiliensis, shrimps and sharks being the most abundant in the landings. Assessment studies indicate overfishing and inferior marketing is an important issue. Underexploited resources include clupeiods, deep shell and slope resources, and lobsters. The shrimp trawl and longline by-catch are not fully utilized.

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