Water quality research or water quality checking: proposed guidelines

A simple plan is outlined to assist in the design of water quality research and monitoring programmes at aquacultureresearch stations. Before monitoring any programme, a decision on the goals of the aquaculture research to be performed is crucial to planning; the plan follows two major pathways--fish yield parameters-water quality checkingprogramme; and, water quality parameters/water quality research programme.

Tonle Sap scoping report

The scoping mission team was composed of 14 people representing research institutions (RUPP), government (FiA, IFReDI), NGOs (ANKO, ADIC) and CGIAR institutions (WorldFish and Bioversity). The scoping trip was carried out over a 7-day period from April 28 to May 4 within eight (8) communities in Kampong Thom, Siem Reap, Battambang, Pursat and Kampong Chhnang. In addition, panel discussions were held with local government, fishery, agriculture and water management institutions, NGOs, the private sector and communities, and were convened in Siem Reap, Battambang and Pursat.

Redistribution of water use and benefits among hydropower affected communities in Lao PDR

In this paper, we assess how resettlement and changes in water access have altered livelihoods of local communities upstream of the Theun Hinboun Expansion Project in Lao PDR. Based on household surveys conducted both before and after resettlement, we estimate changes in water use and benefits among households of 4 resettled villages.

Multiple water use as an approach for increased basin productivity and improved adaptation: a case study from Bangladesh

This study, supported by the Challenge Program Water and Food (CPWF-Project 35), demonstrates the case of multiple-use of water through seasonal aquaculture interventions for improved rice–fish production systems in the Bangladesh floodplains. The project focused on community-based fish culture initiatives, increasingly adopted in the agro-ecological zones of the major floodplains of the Padma, Testa, and Brahmaputra basin. The productivity of water and fish is used as an indicator to explain this case.

Increasing water productivity in agriculture

Water productivity is defined as the amount of agricultural output per unit of water depleted and can be applied to crops, trees livestock and fish. This chapter reviews challenges and opportunities to improve water productivity in socially equitable ways and in different agro-climatic systems. In areas with ample water supply, developing new and making better use of existing water resources are options, whereas in areas with physical water scarcity, better water harvesting and storage is warranted.

Functional aquatic ecosystems, inland fisheries and the Millennium Development Goals

Freshwater allocation in an environment of increasing demand and declining quality and availability is a major societal challenge. While biodiversity and the needs of local communities are often in congruence, the over-riding necessity of meeting national demands for power, food and, increasingly, mitigation of the hydrological effects of climate change, often supersedes these.

Evaluating the flow regulating functions of natural ecosystems in the Zambezi River Basin

By mitigating the vagaries of climate variability, agricultural water storage is widely anticipated to make a key contribution to climate change adaptation in Africa. However, if the planning of water storage is not improved, it is likely that many investments will fail to fully deliver intended benefits. This report describes the agricultural water storage continuum and some of the possible implications of climate change.

Waste vegetable leaves as feeds for juvenile Oreochromis shiranus and Tilapia rendalli in mono-and polyculture.

Mixed sexes of Oreochromis shiranus and Tilapia rendalli were stocked in 5-m super(3) concrete tanks in the ratios of 0:100, 25:75, 100:0 and 75:25, at the rate of 6 fish m super(-2). O shiranus and T. rendalli were stocked at mean body weights ( not equal to SD) of 12 not equal to 0.4 g and 12 not equal to 0.7 g, respectively. Cabbage and pumpkin leaves were added to the tanks at a rate chosen to simulate pond conditions (50 kg dry matter (DM) ha super(-1) day super(-1)) as bundles tied with wire, fully submerged at a depth of about 30 cm.

Mapping of aquatic resource systems with areas of potential aquaculture in Ghana.

Aquatic resource systems with potential for aquaculture development in Ghana were demarcated: lagoons, bays and estuaries; rivers; lakes and large reservoirs; small water bodies; floodplains and swamps. Where available, areaestimates are given, together with data on existing aquaculture and fisheries activities. Potential technologies for further development are briefly pointed out.


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