Increasing water productivity in agriculture

Increasing water productivity is an important element in improved water management for sustainable agriculture, food security and healthy ecosystem functioning. Water productivity is defined as the amount of agricultural output per unit of water depleted, and can be assessed for crops, trees, livestock and fish. This chapter reviews challenges in and opportunities for improving water productivity in socially equitable and sustainable ways by thinking beyond technologies, and fostering enabling institutions and policies.

Water and fisheries

This paper highlights the importance of fisheries and aquaculture in management of the world’s water resources. It underlines the value of these resources and the critical importance of managing water quantity and quality for fisheries and aquaculture as well as for other human uses. This will require more holistic approaches to water management and the effective governance systems these require.

Policy, planning and management at the land-water interface

Historically, land and water management within many coastal deltas has focused on the exclusion of saline water flows that move upstream from the coast. However, this approach fails to recognize the diversity of rural livelihoods and ecosystems in coastal deltaic areas, the environmental consequences of altering natural saline water flows and the emergence of new activities such as shrimp farming that require brackish water.

Fish fights over fish rights: managing exit from the fisheries and security implications for Southeast Asia: final case study report

Fishery has long been part of the staple diet of the people in Cambodia. As Cambodia moves to wards a free market economy, the commercial pressure on natural resources has dramatically increased. Privatization of the remaining fishery resources has had a great impact on local livelihoods, leading to an alarming increase in conflict over fisheries. In order to protect people livelihood and natural resources, NGOs, has advocated that government institutions apply more effort to solving fishery problems.

Willingness to pay for conserving Layawan watershed for domestic water supply in Oroquieta City, Philippines

The sustainability of domestic water supply from the Layawan Watershed in Oroquieta City critically depends on past and present conservation activities and the availability of funds from stakeholders such as households, communities, non-government organizations, private entities and government agencies. This study determined the willingness to pay (WTP) particularly of households in Oroquieta City to finance conservation projects in Layawan Watershed to ensure the sustainability of domestic water supply.

Water quality research or water quality checking: proposed guidelines

A simple plan is outlined to assist in the design of water quality research and monitoring programmes at aquacultureresearch stations. Before monitoring any programme, a decision on the goals of the aquaculture research to be performed is crucial to planning; the plan follows two major pathways--fish yield parameters-water quality checkingprogramme; and, water quality parameters/water quality research programme.

Tonle Sap scoping report

The scoping mission team was composed of 14 people representing research institutions (RUPP), government (FiA, IFReDI), NGOs (ANKO, ADIC) and CGIAR institutions (WorldFish and Bioversity). The scoping trip was carried out over a 7-day period from April 28 to May 4 within eight (8) communities in Kampong Thom, Siem Reap, Battambang, Pursat and Kampong Chhnang. In addition, panel discussions were held with local government, fishery, agriculture and water management institutions, NGOs, the private sector and communities, and were convened in Siem Reap, Battambang and Pursat.

Solomon Islands Aquatic Agricultural Systems program design document

WorldFish is leading the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems together with two other CGIAR Centers; the International Water Management Institute (IWMI) and Bioversity. In 2012 and 2013 the AAS Program rolled out in Solomon Islands, Zambia, Bangladesh, Cambodia and the Philippines. Aquatic Agricultural Systems are places where farming and fishing in freshwater and/or coastal ecosystems contribute significantly to household income and food security. The program goal is to improve the well-being of AAS-dependent people.

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