Willingness to pay for conserving Layawan watershed for domestic water supply in Oroquieta City, Philippines

The sustainability of domestic water supply from the Layawan Watershed in Oroquieta City critically depends on past and present conservation activities and the availability of funds from stakeholders such as households, communities, non-government organizations, private entities and government agencies. This study determined the willingness to pay (WTP) particularly of households in Oroquieta City to finance conservation projects in Layawan Watershed to ensure the sustainability of domestic water supply.

Concurrent rice-fish trials: comparing regular and border planting patterns

Details are given of experiments conducted at the Freshwater Aquaculture Centre at Munoz, Philippines, to investigate the effects of varying the rice planting pattern on fish yields in integrated rice field aquaculture systems.Regular planting and border planting patterns were compared and Tilapia zillii and Cyprinus carpio species were involved in the trials.

Policy, planning and management at the land-water interface

Historically, land and water management within many coastal deltas has focused on the exclusion of saline water flows that move upstream from the coast. However, this approach fails to recognize the diversity of rural livelihoods and ecosystems in coastal deltaic areas, the environmental consequences of altering natural saline water flows and the emergence of new activities such as shrimp farming that require brackish water.

Is water productivity relevant in fisheries and aquaculture?

We present a critical analysis of the application of the water productivity concept in fisheries and aquaculture, defining the scope of application of the concept and limitations. A revised framework is presented and potential issues raised, highlighting areas for further research. A pluralistic approach including socialecological assessments and the explicit consideration of trade-offs between the objectives of increased food production, ecosystem conservation and poverty alleviation is proposed.

Investigation of aquaculture dynamics in a Ramsar site using earth observation systems in conjunction with a socio-economic assessment

This study presents a comprehensive site-scale analysis conducted within the global wetland inventory and mapping (GWIM) project. GWIM was developed and promoted by the International Water Management Institute (IWMI) through global partnerships to investigate wetland analyses at multiple scales. The present study investigates the complexity of an inland freshwater wetland system, presenting a conceptual framework for mapping and monitoring the dynamics of Lake Kolleru (a wetland of international importance, as defined by the Ramsar Convention), utilizing a geospatial platform.

Integrating fish resources to agro-ecosystem analyses

In October 2005, a consortium of partners led by the International Water Management Institute (IWMI) proposed a project aimed at integrating fish resources management in agricultural management in the Tonle Sap area. This 2-years project assistance was accepted for funding by the Challenge Program on Water and Food and started in January 2008. The overall goal of this project is to improve allocation and use of water in combined farming and fishing systems in order to enhance food security of rural communities and water productivity.

Integrated management of aquatic resources: a Bayesian Approach to water control and trade-offs in Southern Vietnam

The BayFish-Bac Lieu model presented in this chapter is a Bayesian model that aims to identify optimal water control regimes and trade-offs between water uses in order to improve management of water-dependent resources in the inland coastal area of Bac Lieu Province, Mekong Delta, Vietnam. The model was developed between 2004 and 2007 and integrated local databases, outputs from the Vietnam River Systems and Plains (VRSAP) model and stakeholder consultations.

Redistribution of water use and benefits among hydropower affected communities in Lao PDR

In this paper, we assess how resettlement and changes in water access have altered livelihoods of local communities upstream of the Theun Hinboun Expansion Project in Lao PDR. Based on household surveys conducted both before and after resettlement, we estimate changes in water use and benefits among households of 4 resettled villages.

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