Wetland agroecosystems

Commencing with a summary of the current status, importance and productivity of natural wetlands the contribution of wetland ecological functions to sustaining vital ecosystem services is then reviewed. Provisioning services, notably fish and water for irrigation or domestic and industrial purposes constitute important benefits derived by humanity from wetlands, whilst recognition is growing that supporting, regulating and cultural services supported by wetlands are critical for sustaining social-economic systems and ensuring human well-being.

Sustainable production of small fish in wetland areas of Bangladesh

Bangladesh is rich in aquatic resources with extensive seasonal and perennial water bodies throughout the country. In the past, the expansive floodplains, oxbow lakes, beels, and haors were home to a vast range of fish species. Of the 260 fishes found in the inland waters of Bangladesh, 150 grow to a small size (maximum length of about 25 cm), and these are found in the wetlands.

Supporting gender-inclusive dialogue over natural resource management

Rural households who fail to gain a voice in decisions over the management of shared forests, pasturelands, wetlands and fisheries face heightened risks to their livelihoods, particularly as competition increases between existing and new user groups. Exclusion from decision-making increases vulnerability of rural households, making it more difficult for them to move out of poverty and thwarting broader efforts to achieve sustainable resource management. Poor rural women in particular often face institutionalized barriers to effective participation in resource management.

Increased production of small fish in wetlands combats micronutrient deficiencies in Bangladesh

Increased production of mola and other small fish can be achieved through stock enhancement and sustainable management of natural wetlands. Enhanced fish production can increase consumption and provide nutritional benefits, especially for women and young children, as they suffer from high rates of malnutrition, including micronutrient deficiencies. Mola and other small fish, which are eaten whole, have high contents of vitamins and minerals. In recent years, there has been a reduction in fish production and biodiversity in wetland areas of Bangladesh.

Community fish refuges in Cambodia: Lesson learned

Cambodia's wetlands cover over 30 percent of the country’s land area and support one of the largest, most diverse and intensive freshwater fisheries in the world. In the flood season (July-February), the flood waters from the Mekong River and Tonle Sap Lake catchments create a vast open water system on Cambodia’s lowlands. During this period, inundated rice fields become open access fishing grounds for local villagers and migrant fishers.

Understanding livelihoods dependent on inland fisheries in Bangladesh and Southeast Asia: Vietnam summary report

This is one of the four countries reports which provides an assessment of the livelihoods strategies of the poor people dependent on inland fisheries in Vietnam. The project aimed to characterise the poor, identify their dependence upon aquatic resources, the nature and status of those resources, and their vulnerabilities in relation to loss or mismanagement. Constraints and possible research priorities have been identified through consultations with poor fishers and other aquatic resource users, and with other organizations. Fisheries resource status has been summarized.

Understanding livelihoods dependent on inland fisheries in Bangladesh and Southeast Asia: synthesis report

This report provides an assessment of the livelihoods strategies of the poor people dependent on inland fisheries in Bangladesh, Cambodia, the Lao PDR and Vietnam. Drawing upon the results of a one year investigation under the Project entitled "Understanding Livelihoods Dependent on Inland Fisheries", policies and institutions for fisheries management and livelihoods assets of the stakeholders in inland fisheries in the four countries. The report also discusses the trends and changes in fisheries and wetland resources.

Spatial dynamics versus social dynamics: understanding trade offs in ecological and socio-economic systems

This paper is based on a first phase of a study in the Muthurajawela-Negombo wetland complex and aims to assess the overall spatial linkages between ecological and socioeonomic aspects of the wetland system using a geospatial model; incorporating biophysical and socioeconomic parameters for analysing and modelling the changes in the coastal wetland-agriculture-aquaculture complex.

Seasonal dynamics of physico-chemical characteristics and biological responses of Lake Chilwa, Southern Africa

Lake Chilwa is shared by Malawi and Mozambique, it supports an important fishery and its watershed is undergoing rapid population growth and increasing utilization for agricultural production. It is a shallow, closed basin lake with extensive surrounding wetlands; and it has suffered several desiccation events in the last century. To better understand the current condition of the lake, we monitored a suite of physical, chemical and biological parameters at approximately monthly intervals over an annual cycle in 2004–2005.

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