Methods of consensus building for community-based fisheries management in Bangladesh and the Mekong Delta

A method of consensus building for management of wetlands and fisheries using a systematic approach to participatory planning and initially developed in Bangladesh is now being applied in both Bangladesh and the Mekong delta. The method recognizes diversity in livelihoods and works through a structured learning and planning process that focuses on common interests. It works with each category of stakeholder separately to prioritize the natural resource problems that their livelihoods are largely dependent on; they then share and agree common priorities in plenary.

Increased production of small fish in wetlands combats micronutrient deficiencies in Bangladesh

Increased production of mola and other small fish can be achieved through stock enhancement and sustainable management of natural wetlands. Enhanced fish production can increase consumption and provide nutritional benefits, especially for women and young children, as they suffer from high rates of malnutrition, including micronutrient deficiencies. Mola and other small fish, which are eaten whole, have high contents of vitamins and minerals. In recent years, there has been a reduction in fish production and biodiversity in wetland areas of Bangladesh.

Experiences in wetland co-management: the MACH project

Banchte Shekha is an NGO based in Jessore, south-west Bangladesh that has supported the development and empowerment of poor people, particularly women. In the CBFM-2 project they found it was possible to involve women in fisheries activities, despite initial opposition from conservative groups. Banchte Shekha was responsible for organizing 7 CBOs in CBFM-2 following their successful experiences with a single CBO in the first phase of the project.

Understanding livelihoods dependent on inland fisheries in Bangladesh and Southeast Asia: final technical report

The Department for International Development (DFID) through the Marine Resources Assessment Group (MRAG) has approved the project proposal for the Project Memorandum on “Understanding Livelihoods Dependent on Inland Fisheries in Bangladesh and South East Asia” based on an earlier concept note on the same topic. The project characterizes the poor, identifies their dependence upon aquatic resources, describes the nature and status of those resources, and emphasizes the vulnerability of the poor to loss or mismanagement of these resources.

Spatial dynamics versus social dynamics: understanding trade offs in ecological and socio-economic systems

This paper is based on a first phase of a study in the Muthurajawela-Negombo wetland complex and aims to assess the overall spatial linkages between ecological and socioeonomic aspects of the wetland system using a geospatial model; incorporating biophysical and socioeconomic parameters for analysing and modelling the changes in the coastal wetland-agriculture-aquaculture complex.

Seasonality dynamics for investigating wetland-agriculture nexus and its ecosystems service values in Chibuto, Mozambique

This study is a subsection of CPWF-30 (Challenge Program on Water and Food) that centers on investigating the wetland, agriculture, and livelihoods interactions. Chibuto, the floodplain of Changane River in Mozambique is a representative downstream site for the Limpopo sub-catchment. It largely serves as an agro-ecosystem with agricultural, grazing, and fiber collection as the prominent set of ecosystem services. The present analysis is a three-tier framework conceptualized to develop a synoptic overview of spatial, social, and economic elements that governs the system dynamics.

Salaphoum: learning from experiences in villager led action research

This DVD is a community produced film made on location in two Salaphoum villages in Stung Treng, NE Cambodia. It forms part of an ongoing social research initiative supported by teh local NGO CEPA and the WorldFish Center, with financial support provided by Sida through the Wetlands Alliance. The film documents some of the process adn experiences of conducting villager led research and includes video interviews with Salaphoum researchers, research assistants, NGO staff and local authorities.

Wetlands

After commencing with a summary of the current status, importance and productivity of natural wetlands, the chapter reviews the contribution of wetland ecological functions to sustaining vital ecosystem services. Wetlands are vulnerable to a range of anthropogenic pressures, notably land use change, disruption to regional hydrological regimes as a result of abstraction and impoundment, pollution and excessive nutrient loading, the introduction of invasive species and overexploitation of biomass, plants and animals.

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