Two steps forward, two steps back: The role of innovation in transforming towards community-based marine resource management in Solomon Islands

In many coastal nations, community-based arrangements for marine resource management (CBRM) are promoted by government, advocated for by non-government actors, and are seen by both as one of the most promising options to achieve sustainable use and secure inshore fisheries and aquatic resources. Although there is an abundant literature on what makes CBRM effective, is it less clear how CBRM is introduced or develops as an idea in a community, and the process of how the idea leads to the adoption of a new resource management approach with supporting institutions.

Solomon Islands: Western Hub scoping report

Aquatic agricultural systems (AAS) are places where farming and fishing in freshwater and/or coastal ecosystems contribute significantly to household income and food security. Globally, the livelihoods of many poor and vulnerable people are dependent on these systems. In recognition of the importance of AAS, the CGIAR Research Program (CRP) is undertaking a new generation of global agricultural research programs on key issues affecting global food security and rural development. The overall goal of the research program is to improve the well-being of people dependent on these systems.

Responses to climate change: adaptation pathways to change

This project, Responding to Climate Change Using an Adaptation Pathways and Decision-making Approach, funded by the Asian Development Bank (ADB), aims to strengthen coastal and marine resource management in the Coral Triangle of the Pacific, by assisting communities in Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Timor Leste and Vanuatu to develop their own climate change adaptation implementation plans.

Principles for best practice for community-based resource management (CBRM) in Solomon Islands

This document is one outcome from a workshop held in Gizo in October 2010 attended by 82 representatives from government, NGO’s private sector, and communities. The target audience for the document is primarily organizations planning to work with coastal communities of Solomon Islands to implement Community-Based Resource Management (CBRM). It is however also envisaged that the document will serve as a reference for communities to better understand what to expect from their partners and also for donors, to be informed about agreed approaches amongst Solomon Islands stakeholders.

A preliminary account of the population dynamics of Stolephorus devisi (Engraulidae) at Munda Baitground, Solomon Islands

Estimates of growth parameters for Stolephorus devisi (Engraulidae) at Munda Baitground, Solomon Islands were obtained using the Compleat ELEFAN software. Also, estimates of natural and fishing mortality are presented, along with recruitment patterns. All results are presented on a per year basis for 1985-1987

Planning the use of fish for food security in Solomon Islands

This study was funded through the USAID-supported Coral Triangle Support Partnership (CTSP). As part of the US CTI Support Program, CTSP is part of the United States Government’s commitment to promote the sustainable management of the marine and coastal resources in the Coral Triangle. In cooperation with the Coral Triangle national governments and the international community, CTSP is a five-year program that provides technical assistance and helps build capacity to address critical issues including food security, climate change, and marine biological diversity.

Mangrove management in Solomon Islands: Case studies from Malaita Province

Mangroves are an important resource for the rural coastal people of Solomon Islands. Mangrove forests are critical for food security and the livelihoods of coastal communities in Solomon Islands. In particular, mangroves are an important source of food (e.g. fish, mangrove fruit, shells and crabs) and timber (e.g. for firewood and building materials).

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