Meeting the food and nutrition needs of the poor: the role of fish and the opportunities and challenges emerging from the rise of aquaculture

People who are food and nutrition insecure largely reside in Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa and for many, fish represents a rich source of protein, micronutrients and essential fatty acids. The contribution of fish to household food and nutrition security depends upon availability, access and cultural and personal preferences. Access is largely determined by location, seasonality and price but at the individual level it also depends upon a person's physiological and health status and how fish is prepared, cooked and shared among household members.

Fish Trade for a Better Future program brochure

Over the past 5 years, fish processors and traders, along with government leaders, have begun to demand a change in the way Africa trades its fish. In May 2014, the second Conference of African Ministers of Fisheries and Aquaculture (CAMFA) endorsed the African Union Policy Framework and Reform Strategy for Fisheries and Aquaculture in Africa, which prioritizes fish trade and aims to promote responsible and equitable fish trade and marketing by significantly harnessing the benefits of Africa’s fisheries and aquaculture.

Fish production, consumption and trade in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Review analysis

This analysis is an output of Sub-Saharan Fish Trade in a Changing Climate, a World Bank–funded study conducted in 2010–2011 by WorldFish. Its overall objective is to develop an understanding of the supply and demand for low-value, regionally and domestically traded fish, which are important in the diets of lower-income urban and rural consumers in Sub-Saharan Africa, to inform cooperation on trade and food security and projection of regional trends in supply and demand for food fish.

Utilisation de Tithonia diversifolia et Chromolaena odorata comme fertilisants en étang de pisciculture du tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)=Use of Tithonia diversifolia and Chromolaena odorata as organic fertilisers

The effects of two common weedy grasses in sub-saharan Africa were evaluated as fertilisers in small-scale Nile tilapia ponds for 21 weeks.

Trade matters in the fight against poverty: narratives, perceptions, and (lack of) evidence in the case of fish trade in Africa

Two opposing views exist in the literature on the potential role that international fish trade plays in economic development. While some claim that fish trade has a pro-poor effect, others denounce the negative effect of fish export on local populations’ food security and doubt its contributions to the macro-economy. In this paper, we explore this debate in sub-Saharan Africa. Our analysis did not find any evidence of direct negative impact of fish trade on food security; neither did it find evidence that international fish trade generates positive, pro-poor outcomes.

Review of social science literature on risk and vulnerability to HIV/AIDS in fishing communities in Sub-Saharan Africa

The WorldFish Center and FAO are implementing a regional programme entitled "Fisheries and HIV/AIDS in Africa; investing in sustainable solutions", funded by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida) and the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. As part of this project, the Overseas Development Group/School of Development Studies was asked to produce a literature review on 'Fisheries and HIV/AIDS in Africa: evidence from social science, medical and policy research'.

Profiles of project activities by technical partners under the regional programme "Fisheries and HIV/AIDS: Investing in sustainable solution". Compilation document prepared for the first policy advisory group meeting, 24-26 Mar 2009,...

The WorldFish Center and the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) are currently implementing a Regional Programme entitled Fisheries and HIV/AIDS in Africa: Investing in Sustainable Solutions, to strengthen the capacity in the region to develop sustainable solutions to enhance the contributions of fish and fisheries to economic and human development. In particular, the programme is building a strategic response to HIV/AIDS in the fisheries sector that will generate benefits for vulnerable groups in wider society.

Governance and decentralization reforms in small-scale fisheries: an African perspective

Relying on a framework that highlights different dimensions of ‘decentralization’, this paper reviews fisheries co-management programmes as they have been implemented over the last 20 years in sub-Saharan Africa. It shows that in most cases, fisheries co-management programmes failed to improve governance, but simply altered the distribution of power and responsibility amongst the different stakeholders.

Fish supply and food security for Africa

Fish is an important food for over 400 million Africans, contributing essential proteins, minerals and micronutrients to their diets. Paradoxically, despite the high dependence on fish as a source of animal protein, fish consumption in sub-Saharan Africa is the world's lowest. The continent is projected to need an additional 1.6 million tons of fish a year by 2015 just to maintain current consumption.

Demand for fish in Sub-Saharan Africa: the past and the future.

The Sub-Saharan region of Africa accounted for only 5.5% of the world's demand for fish from 1989 to 1991, inspite of comprising 9% of the global population. This study was carried out to determine the future demand for fish in the Sub-Saharan region. Fish accounts for approximately 10% of animal protein consumed. It is prominent in the diet of the poor since cured and smoked fish is a cheaper source of protein than meat or eggs. The average per capita consumption in 1992 was about 8 kg compared to 30 kg globally.

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