Gender situational analysis of the Barotse Floodplain

Zambia’s rivers, lakes and wetlands support extensive agriculture, fisheries and livestock production and contribute to the livelihoods of about 3 million people or 25% of the country’s population. These aquatic agricultural systems are particularly important to poor people and provide significant opportunities for agriculture-based economic growth. The majority (72%) of the Zambian population is engaged in agricultural activities, of which almost 65% are women. There is now widespread recognition of the importance of gender and development.

Fisheries co-management: the Zambian experience

Since the late 1980’s various forms of fisheries co-management initiatives have been implemented in some of the major fisheries in Zambia. The reasons for instituting co-management arrangements have been varied and have ranged from the need to control the influx of immigrant fishermen to the desire to encourage the use of legal fishing gear. This paper looks at the manner that co-management has evolved in three fisheries namely Lake Kariba, Lake Bangweulu and the Mweru-Luapula fisheries. It shows that after more than 10 years of co-management the results are still mixed.

The 'Fish Trader+' model: reducing female traders' vulnerability to HIV

Analysis from research and practice in Africa shows that fishing communities are hardly reached by HIV-related services, education, and business services, partly because of the efforts and costs involved and a lack of good practice in reaching out to these often remote areas. At the same time, fish traders, especially women, travel regularly to remote fishing camps to purchase fish. Although female fish traders may be exposed to HIV, violence and abuse in their interactions and relationships with fishermen, economic necessity keeps them in this trade.

Assessment of agrobiodiversity resources in the Borotse flood plain, Zambia

Concerns about perceived loss of indigenous materials emerged from multiple stakeholders during consultations to plan and design the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems for the Borotse hub in Zambia’s Western Province. To come to grips with and address the concerns, the AAS Borotse hub program of work included an assessment of agrobiodiversity to inform community-level and program initiatives and actions.

Annual report 2013/2014

Improving the productivity of fisheries and aquaculture is vital to reducing hunger and poverty for millions of people in the developing world. Today, fish provides more than one billion poor people with most of their daily animal-source protein and, globally, more than 250 million people depend directly on fisheries and aquaculture for their livelihoods; millions more are employed in fisheries and aquaculture value chains.

Technical guidelines for economic valuation of inland small-scale fisheries in developing countries

These “Technical Guidelines for Economic Valuation of Inland Small-scale Fisheries in Developing Countries” are one of the outputs of the project on “Food security and poverty alleviation through improved valuation and governance of river fisheries in Africa”. The guidelines draw upon research results and experience gained during the course of the project.

Report of the first meeting of the roundtable consultative group on HIV/AIDS in Luapula fisheries, Zambia

The WorldFish Center organized a roundtable meeting in Mansa, Zambia to provide to provide an opportunity for a wide range of agencies to exchange their knowledge and experiences of working with fishing communities and fish traders in Luapula Province. A total of 28 people participated, from government, NGOs and civil society, 6 of whom traveled from Lusaka.

Profiles of project activities by technical partners under the regional programme "Fisheries and HIV/AIDS: Investing in sustainable solution". Compilation document prepared for the first policy advisory group meeting, 24-26 Mar 2009,...

The WorldFish Center and the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) are currently implementing a Regional Programme entitled Fisheries and HIV/AIDS in Africa: Investing in Sustainable Solutions, to strengthen the capacity in the region to develop sustainable solutions to enhance the contributions of fish and fisheries to economic and human development. In particular, the programme is building a strategic response to HIV/AIDS in the fisheries sector that will generate benefits for vulnerable groups in wider society.

Impact of nutrition and fish supplementation on the response to anti retroviral therapy, Zambia: a literature review

This work is part of the Regional Programme Fisheries and HIV/AIDS in Africa: Investing in Sustainable Solutions, implemented by the WorldFish Center and funded by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida) and the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The research study analyses the effects of a fish supplemented diet on HIV/AIDS patients’ response to Anti Retroviral Treatment (ART).

Baseline study: nutritional status, food security and fish consumption among people living with HIV/AIDS in Zambia: summary

Under the regional programme Fisheries and HIV/AIDS in Africa, the University of Zambia, in collaboration with the WorldFish Center, has undertaken a baseline survey of the nutritional status and fish consumption of people living with HIV/AIDS in Zambia.

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