WorldFish annual report 2011/12

This year's report contains the Director General's and Chairman's statements. Also highlighted in the reports, are stories of projects with different partners: 1) CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) in Zambia. 2) Wetland Alliance project in the Mekong delta. 3) Projects with CARE, the humanitarian organisation in Egypt. 4) Tilapia breeding program with Water Research Institute (WRI) in Ghana. 5) Partnerships with the private sector on sustainable aquaculture enterprise in developing countries.

Zamaiso ye Zwezipili ya Litapi mwa Libala la Bulozi – Pizo ya ku eza sesiñwi ka putako

Batu ba ba pilela fa lika ze fumanwa mwa Libala la Bulozi, ba ba fumana sico ni buiketo bwa mubili ni moya, ba akalezwa ku fita fa palo ya bo lule ba mashumi a ketalizoho ka amabeli (70 000). Kono ki zamaiso ye maswe, ku yamba kwa swalelele ni ku itusisa lisebeliso za businyi ze fukulize litapi ka bubebe bo bu komokisa , mwa nako ye kuswani.

Strengthening collective action to address resource conflict in Lake Kariba, Zambia

Where natural resources are a key component of the rural economy, the ability of the poor to realize their visions for the future depends significantly on institutional structures that govern resource access and management. This case study reports on an initiative on the shores of Lake Kariba in Zambia, where lakeshore residents face competition over fishing, tourism, and commercial aquaculture.

The Role of Fish in the First 1,000 Days in Zambia

Fish is especially rich in essential omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and micronutrients, including bioavailable calcium, iron and zinc. Fish features prominently in the diet of most, especially poor, Zambians. Despite this, its significance in the diet of women and children in the first 1,000 days is not well understood. Our current knowledge of the nutrient content of commonly consumed fish species in Zambia is synthesised.

Learning from implementation of community selection in Zambia, Solomon Islands, and Bangladesh AAS hubs

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) is a research in development program which aims to foster innovation to respond to community needs, and through networking and social learning to bring about development outcomes and impact at scale. It aims to reach the poorest and most vulnerable communities that are dependent upon aquatic agricultural systems. AAS uses monitoring and evaluation to track progress along identified impact pathways for accountability and learning.

Gender-transformative approaches to address inequalities in food, nutrition and economic outcomes in aquatic agricultural systems

Over the past few decades, scholars and practitioners working on gender and development issues have advocated for more in-depth analyses that explore and foster change in the social institutions that create and perpetuate gender inequalities. Gender integration approaches in a research and development context are thus not something new. However, mainstream agricultural research and development programs often apply a rather simple understanding of gender to the design of such approaches, resulting in poor implementation.

Fisheries co-management: the Zambian experience

Since the late 1980’s various forms of fisheries co-management initiatives have been implemented in some of the major fisheries in Zambia. The reasons for instituting co-management arrangements have been varied and have ranged from the need to control the influx of immigrant fishermen to the desire to encourage the use of legal fishing gear. This paper looks at the manner that co-management has evolved in three fisheries namely Lake Kariba, Lake Bangweulu and the Mweru-Luapula fisheries. It shows that after more than 10 years of co-management the results are still mixed.

The 'Fish Trader+' model: reducing female traders' vulnerability to HIV

Analysis from research and practice in Africa shows that fishing communities are hardly reached by HIV-related services, education, and business services, partly because of the efforts and costs involved and a lack of good practice in reaching out to these often remote areas. At the same time, fish traders, especially women, travel regularly to remote fishing camps to purchase fish. Although female fish traders may be exposed to HIV, violence and abuse in their interactions and relationships with fishermen, economic necessity keeps them in this trade.

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