Zamaiso ye Zwezipili ya Litapi mwa Libala la Bulozi – Pizo ya ku eza sesiñwi ka putako

Batu ba ba pilela fa lika ze fumanwa mwa Libala la Bulozi, ba ba fumana sico ni buiketo bwa mubili ni moya, ba akalezwa ku fita fa palo ya bo lule ba mashumi a ketalizoho ka amabeli (70 000). Kono ki zamaiso ye maswe, ku yamba kwa swalelele ni ku itusisa lisebeliso za businyi ze fukulize litapi ka bubebe bo bu komokisa , mwa nako ye kuswani.

School holidays: examining childhood, gender norms, and kinship in children's shorter-term residential mobility in urban Zambia

This article discusses a practice of child residential mobility in Zambia that is frequently overlooked in migration studies and difficult to capture through standard survey methods: the practice of 'going on holiday' to the homes of relatives during breaks in the school term. Drawing on child-centered and quantitative research, this article examines the multiple dimensions of 'going on holiday' for children living in a low-income urban settlement in Lusaka. Findings suggest that the practice was gendered and may map onto changing norms in schooling in Zambia.

Piecework (Ganyu) as an indicator of household vulnerability in rural Zambia

Piecework (ganyu) is short-term, casual labor common in rural Zambia and neighboring countries. Reliance on piecework as a strategy to cope during food shortages in the rainy/cultivation season can restrict own-farm production, and thus, is regarded as an indicator of a household's vulnerability to food insecurity. Based on a household's level of participation in piecework, we explore this claim in rural Zambia using survey data collected during the rainy and dry seasons in 2009.

A Governance analysis of the Barotse Floodplain System, Zambia: Identifying obstacles and opportunities

The Barotse floodplain is an ecosystem characterized by a paradox of widespread poverty amidst high ecological and agricultural potential. The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) seeks to address this paradox on the assumption that the rural poor have the potential to transform their lives using the aquatic resources in their environment. Understanding the conditions for natural resources use and management is critical for a program that seeks to transform the livelihoods of households dependent on natural resources.

The 'Fish Trader+' model: reducing female traders' vulnerability to HIV

Analysis from research and practice in Africa shows that fishing communities are hardly reached by HIV-related services, education, and business services, partly because of the efforts and costs involved and a lack of good practice in reaching out to these often remote areas. At the same time, fish traders, especially women, travel regularly to remote fishing camps to purchase fish. Although female fish traders may be exposed to HIV, violence and abuse in their interactions and relationships with fishermen, economic necessity keeps them in this trade.

Exploring the intricate relationship between poverty, gender inequality and rural masculinity: A Case study from an Aquatic Agricultural System in Zambia

Many Zambians rely on wetlands, lakes, and rivers for their livelihoods. Social norms and power relations restrict access to natural resources provided by these aquatic agricultural systems for certain social groups, thus differentially impacting livelihood security (especially for women). A gender transformative lens and the concept of the “masculine rural” helps exploring poverty in the Barotse Floodplain in western Zambia.

Collaborative effort to operationalize the gender transformative approach in the Barotse Floodplain

The gender transformative approach (GTA) being pursued by the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) seeks to address the causes and consequences of gender inequalities. Aquatic agricultural systems are those in which production in natural freshwater and/ or coastal ecosystems contribute substantially to people’s food, nutrition and economic security. This CRP is implemented by WorldFish, International Water Management Institute (IWMI), Bioversity International and a wide range of research and development partners.

Annual report 2012/13

This Annual Report provides just a few examples of the pathways through which WorldFish's work delivers benefits to poor people who rely on fish for food. You will find stories about: 1) Egyptian farmers who are now benefiting from faster growing fish strains; 2) Women in Bangladesh whose incomes have grown because of the increases in production that pond management training has provided; and 3) Improvements in access to fishing grounds and local employment that investment in strengthening aquatic resource governance in Zambia have delivered.

Report of the first meeting of the roundtable consultative group on HIV/AIDS in Luapula fisheries, Zambia

The WorldFish Center organized a roundtable meeting in Mansa, Zambia to provide to provide an opportunity for a wide range of agencies to exchange their knowledge and experiences of working with fishing communities and fish traders in Luapula Province. A total of 28 people participated, from government, NGOs and civil society, 6 of whom traveled from Lusaka.

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