Trophic model of the coastal fisheries ecosystem in the Gulf of Thailand

The biomass of 40 ecological groups, the diet composition of prey and predators, production/biomass (P/B) and consumption/biomass (Q/B) ratios, and catches were used as basic input to parameterize an Ecopath model of the Gulf of Thailand. Following construction of a mass-balance ecosystem model, a time-dynamic simulation model (Ecosim) was used to simulate the impact of change in fishing effort. This was done using time series data to validate the historic fisheries development in the Gulf of Thailand prior to using the model for forward-looking simulations.

Strategic review of the fishery situation in Thailand

Fisheries are an important source of animal protein for most of Thailand’s population, particularly in provinces on or near the coast. Between 1978 and 1997 the per capita consumption of fish averaged 24 kg·capita-1 annually. In 1995, about 535 210 people were involved in the fisheries sector and 44% of these were engaged in small scale marine capture fisheries. Since 1982, Thailand has faced problems with the development of marine capture fisheries and their over-exploitation which has increased fishery conflicts and disputes with neighboring countries.

Rice-fish culture demonstration in Surin Province, Thailand

A brief account is given of project activities conducted regarding promotion of rice-cum-fish culture in Surin Province,Thailand as a means of increasing protein consumption and also income for rural people. The effect of stocking rate and stocking size on production was investigated. Three fish species were used: Cyprinus carpio, Puntius gonionotus and Oreochromis niloticus . It is believed that further research is warranted regarding rice-fish systems in which wild and cultured species can co-exist.

Mollusc fisheries in Thailand

Shellfish production in Thailand has ranged between 50,000 and 300,000 mt over the past twenty years, with recent production around 120,000 mt/yr. Major species are green (Perna viridis ) and horse mussels (Modiolus senhausenii ) making some 60% of total production. The other main types, in order, are short-necked clams (Paphia undulata ) ark shells (Andara granosa ) and oysters (Crassostrea sp.). Culture practices account for 80% of green mussel, cockle and oyster production. Culture began to boom in the mid-seventies following a decline in production of the fisheries.

Integrated fish farming in Thailand

Aquaculture in Thailand is relatively recent. Formerly, there were ample freshwater fish in natural water bodies such as lakes, rivers and canals, but with decreasing catches due to overfishing, pesticide use, and a reduction in the flood plain fishery associated with the construction of irrigation systems, there has been a surge of interest in aquaculture. In contrast to the relatively well defined and stable Chinese system of integrated fish farming, Thai systems are characterized by instability since aquaculture in the country is experiencing a period of rapid evolution.

Socioeconomic assessment of marine fisheries of Thailand

Thailand is currently one of the ten largest fishing nations in the world. In 1996, fish production reached 3.7 million t with 90% of the production coming from the marine fisheries sector and 10% from inland fisheries. Thai fishing operates in four fishing grounds namely, the Gulf of Thailand, the Andaman Sea, the South China Sea and the Bay of Bengal. However with the establishment of the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) in 1977, Thailand lost over 300 000 km2 of traditional fishing grounds.

Preliminary analysis of demersal fish assemblages in coastal waters of the Gulf of Thailand

The 1995 trawl data of the research vessels Pramong 2 and 9 in the Gulf of Thailand were analyzed using TWINSPAN and DCA. Four main station clusters were identified related to geographic location and depth. Two clusters are associated with shallow water areas and the other two clusters are found in deeper areas with water depths > 30 m. Temporal analysis indicates clustering of monthly data into wet and dry seasons. Examination of species abundance data indicates that the seasonality may not be very pronounced.

Overview of sea cucumber aquaculture and sea-ranching research in the South-East Asian region

South-East Asia has traditionally been the global centre of production of tropical sea cucumbers for Chinese markets. Early research into culture methods took place outside this region, notably in India, the Pacific region and China. However, recent investment in Holothuria scabra (sandfish) culture has led to some significant advances within this region. The Philippines and Vietnam have been at the forefront of recent efforts, with involvement from substantial national programs and local institutions as well as international donors and scientific organisations.

Observations on freshwater aquaculture and extension in Malaysia, Thailand, Japan and Taiwan

As part of the Philippines' plan to accelerate the country's rate of aquaculture development, a study team was sent to neighboring Southeast Asian countries to observe advances for improving and developing aquaculture in the Philippines. The 3-man team, of which the author was a member, toured Malaysia, Thailand, Japan, and Taiwan. This article is a brief account of observations from the trip and interviews with authorities from selected fisheries agencies, with emphasis on freshwater aquaculture.

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