WorldFish accomplishes its research through more than 160 donor-funded projects that are part of the CGIAR Research Programs.

The project aims to help small-scale shrimp and prawn farmers work collaboratively and scale up their participation in export market value chains, while also focusing on food safety, animal health, and the associated environmental and social issues.
This project explores the future of aquaculture development in Indonesia and identifies pathways for growth.

WorldFish, USAID and the Government of Bangladesh (GoB) have come together to support the country’s coastal fishing communities and improve food security through research-led fisheries management initiatives. The project seeks to strengthen the ability of local communities, especially women, to extract maximum benefit from coastal environments using sustainable best practices and to mitigate the adverse affects of climate change. It will work closely with small-scale artisanal catch fisheries that target hilsa shad, the national fish of Bangladesh.

Rice field fisheries constitute a vital source of income and nutrition for Cambodia’s poor farmers. However, as population and demand for fish grows, there has been a marked decline in yields and a degradation of aquatic biodiversity. Intensification of rice farming, pesticides and damage to habitats have also contributed to this problem. WorldFish is partnering with NGOs, local authorities and national universities to research ways to increase productivity, expand rice field fisheries while seeking innovative ways to increase biodiversity and protect ecosystems.

A new, improved strain of tilapia could have enormous benefits for India’s poor, boosting yields, increasing nutritional benefits and opening aquaculture to more people. Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia (GIFT) could address the twin problems Indian producers face with current strains by improving the quality of the bloodstock and increasing efficiencies. The project, in partnership with Rajiv Gandhi Center for Aquaculture, involves the establishment of a nucleus for the selective breeding and genetic improvement of the GIFT tilapia in India.

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WorldFish, USAID and the Government of Bangladesh (GoB) have come together to support the country’s coastal fishing communities and improve food security through research-led fisheries management initiatives. The project seeks to strengthen the ability of local communities, especially women, to extract maximum benefit from coastal environments using sustainable best practices and to mitigate the adverse affects of climate change. It will work closely with small-scale artisanal catch fisheries that target hilsa shad, the national fish of Bangladesh.

Rice field fisheries constitute a vital source of income and nutrition for Cambodia’s poor farmers. However, as population and demand for fish grows, there has been a marked decline in yields and a degradation of aquatic biodiversity. Intensification of rice farming, pesticides and damage to habitats have also contributed to this problem. WorldFish is partnering with NGOs, local authorities and national universities to research ways to increase productivity, expand rice field fisheries while seeking innovative ways to increase biodiversity and protect ecosystems.

A new, improved strain of tilapia could have enormous benefits for India’s poor, boosting yields, increasing nutritional benefits and opening aquaculture to more people. Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia (GIFT) could address the twin problems Indian producers face with current strains by improving the quality of the bloodstock and increasing efficiencies. The project, in partnership with Rajiv Gandhi Center for Aquaculture, involves the establishment of a nucleus for the selective breeding and genetic improvement of the GIFT tilapia in India.

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