Although about 43% of the African continent is considered arid and water-poor, it supports the livelihoods of nearly 485 million people. This part of the continent is largely ignored as having potential for aquaculture development, but it has underground water sources (including brackish water aquifers), dams, seasonal ponds and pools from abandoned open-cast mines that all could be used for aquaculture. Furthermore, the abundant solar radiation is an inexpensive and sustainable source of energy for operating closed and open aquaculture systems and for preserving postharvest fish and fish products. Exploiting this potential requires research and development of climate-smart and efficient aquaculture technologies adaptable to water-deficient conditions. The ACliSAT project aims to improve rural livelihood and households’ resilience through aquaculture in Egypt, Ethiopia and Eriteria by sustainably increasing fish production and productivity, nutrition and income generation of fish farmers. The 3-year project will leverage improvements in pond designs and construction for efficient water use. It will also leverage improvements in feed production and feeding technology, as well as adaptation and improved culture practices of Nile Tilapia for different water and temperature conditions. Using these improvements, the project will stimulate growth in emerging and existing aquaculture sectors by sharing knowledge with fish farmers, research centers, extension agencies and service providers on aquaculture technologies and improving the engagement of women and youths in aquaculture activities.

Related sustainable development goals: