Since 1987, WorldFish has been working with the Malawi Government, universities and development partners to create a more productive fisheries sector that contributes to diversified and resilient rural livelihoods and promotes food and nutrition security. Past efforts have included developing improved aquaculture technologies, implementing holistic ecosystem approaches to fisheries management, supporting the creation of improved fisheries policies, and providing scientific training to partners in Malawi, Mozambique and Zambia.

WorldFish has a long history of working in Africa, including in nearby Ghana and Cameroon, to strengthen the continent’s aquaculture sector by conducting research and providing training. WorldFish aims to harness this experience, combined with its expertise in fish genetics, to boost aquaculture productivity and enhance nutrition and food security in Nigeria. WorldFish will draw on its involvement and support from the African Union InterAfrican Bureau of Animal Resources to deliver this work.

WorldFish focuses on testing technologies that improve the productivity of fisheries and aquaculture and strengthen value chains to increase incomes of fishdependent people in Zambia and throughout sub-Saharan Africa. WorldFish works in the Barotse Floodplain of western Zambia where its research focuses on testing improved fish processing technologies and social innovations to reduce post-harvest losses and improve gender relations throughout the fishery value chain.

MYFC, a Livelihoods and Food Security Trust Fund (LIFT) funded project, aims to promote sustainable growth of aquaculture in Myanmar. By introducing low cost poly-culture combining small indigenous species of fish with mostly carps, the project intends to increase income, food and nutrition security for resource-poor households in the Ayeyarwady Delta and the central dry zone (CDZ). With a particular focus on women and children, and running over three years (2016-2018), MYFC will target four townships in each area.

The Managing Aquatic Agricultural Systems to Improve Nutrition and Livelihoods in Rural Myanmar (MYNutrition) project intends to adapt and scale up the successful innovative integrated aquaculture and fisheries/agriculture-nutrition linkages developed under the IFAD-funded Small Fish and Nutrition project in northeast and northwest rural Bangladesh in 2010-2013.

Aquaculture’s contribution to the world’s food basket is essential as global demand for fish grows. Today, fish provides more than 1 billion people with most of their daily animal protein. And, in regions with the greatest number of resource-poor and vulnerable people, fish is often the primary animal-source food. This fact sheet presents the key benefits of aquaculture to nutrition, food security and the role of WorldFish in supporting and improving the growth of sustainable aquaculture.

Technology and knowledge transfer has been a great challenge for many developing countries in South Asia due to poor information and communications technology networks. A limited number of institutions focused on science and technology, weak linkages among private and public institutions and political instability. These factors have hampered the successful transfer and diffusion of new and proven technologies between countries.

Aquaculture’s contribution to the world’s food basket is essential as global demand for fish grows. Today, fish provides more than 1 billion people with most of their daily animal protein. And, in regions with the greatest number of resource-poor and vulnerable people, fish is often the primary animal-source food. This fact sheet presents the key benefits of aquaculture to nutrition, food security and the role of WorldFish in supporting and improving the growth of sustainable aquaculture.

Technology and knowledge transfer has been a great challenge for many developing countries in South Asia due to poor information and communications technology networks. A limited number of institutions focused on science and technology, weak linkages among private and public institutions and political instability. These factors have hampered the successful transfer and diffusion of new and proven technologies between countries.