MYFC, a Livelihoods and Food Security Trust Fund (LIFT) funded project, aims to promote sustainable growth of aquaculture in Myanmar. By introducing low cost poly-culture combining small indigenous species of fish with mostly carps, the project intends to increase income, food and nutrition security for resource-poor households in the Ayeyarwady Delta and the central dry zone (CDZ). With a particular focus on women and children, and running over three years (2016-2018), MYFC will target four townships in each area.

MYFC, a Livelihoods and Food Security Trust Fund (LIFT) funded project, aims to promote sustainable growth of aquaculture in Myanmar. By introducing low cost poly-culture combining small indigenous species of fish with mostly carps, the project intends to increase income, food and nutrition security for resource-poor households in the Ayeyarwady Delta and the central dry zone (CDZ). With a particular focus on women and children, and running over three years (2016-2018), MYFC will target four townships in each area.

More than 2 billion people worldwide, particularly in developing countries, are estimated to be deficient in micronutrients, including vitamin A, iron and zinc. These vitamin and mineral deficiencies are a form of undernutrition affecting children and pregnant women. This fact sheet outlines the key benefits of eating fish, a source of micronutrients and essential acids, in alleviating nutrient deficiency.

Aquaculture’s contribution to the world’s food basket is essential as global demand for fish grows. Today, fish provides more than 1 billion people with most of their daily animal protein. And, in regions with the greatest number of resource-poor and vulnerable people, fish is often the primary animal-source food. This fact sheet presents the key benefits of aquaculture to nutrition, food security and the role of WorldFish in supporting and improving the growth of sustainable aquaculture.

The IEIDEAS project, funded by the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation and managed by WorldFish and CARE in collaboration with the Ministry of Agriculture and Land Reclamation, has focused on the development of the Egyptian aquaculture value chain. In 2011, SDC and WorldFish conducted a value chain assessment.

Genetic improvement through selective breeding has been used for millennia on crops and livestock, but up until the 1980s, little had been done to utilize this process for farmed fish. In response to the inadequate supply of tilapia seed and the deteriorating performance of the fish in many aquaculture systems in Asia, WorldFish and partners began the Genetic Improvement of Farmed Tilapia (GIFT) project to develop a faster-growing strain of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) that was suitable for both small-scale and commercial aquaculture.

More than 2 billion people worldwide, particularly in developing countries, are estimated to be deficient in micronutrients, including vitamin A, iron and zinc. These vitamin and mineral deficiencies are a form of undernutrition affecting children and pregnant women. This fact sheet outlines the key benefits of eating fish, a source of micronutrients and essential acids, in alleviating nutrient deficiency.

Hilsa shad is the national fish of Bangladesh. However, overfishing, siltation, pollution and changing climate lead to a sharp decline in the fish population, theatening the livelihoods of the people dependent upon the hilsa fishery. The United States Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Enhanced Coastal Fisheries (ECOFISHBD) project seeks to improve the resilience of the hilsa fishery in the Padma-Meghna river-ecosystem and the livelihoods that depend upon it.

Aquaculture’s contribution to the world’s food basket is essential as global demand for fish grows. Today, fish provides more than 1 billion people with most of their daily animal protein. And, in regions with the greatest number of resource-poor and vulnerable people, fish is often the primary animal-source food. This fact sheet presents the key benefits of aquaculture to nutrition, food security and the role of WorldFish in supporting and improving the growth of sustainable aquaculture.