Technologies for African Agricultural Transformation (TAAT) Aquaculture Compact

The Technologies for African Agricultural Transformation (TAAT) program, funded by the African Development Bank, is a knowledge- and innovation-based response to the need to scale up proven technologies across Africa. The aim is to boost productivity and make Africa self-sufficient in key commodities. The program is being implemented in 22 countries. It focuses on nine priority commodity agricultural value chains (maize, wheat, rice, sorghum/millet, cassava, high-iron bean, orange flesh sweet potato, aquaculture and small livestock) with the support of enablers.

Empowering Women Fish Retailers in Egypt (EWFIRE) Project

In 2018, WorldFish Egypt launched the Empowering Women Fish Retailers (EWFIRE) Project. Funded by the European Commission (EuropeAid), the project supports vulnerable women retailers and processors to develop their businesses in five urban areas across the Sharkia governorate, lower Egypt (Zagazig, Faous, Belbeis, Al-Hussainya and Abu-Kebeer). The objective is to empower existing and new fish retailers by providing training in product development, increasing their market visibility and supporting community-based market development initiatives in Sharkia.

Aquaculture Technical, Vocational and Entrepreneurship Training for Improved Private Sector and Smallholder Skills project in Zambia

Zambia currently has a high rate of youth unemployment. There are also noticeable disparities between men and women in the labor force, especially a lack of women formally working in the fisheries sector who have received fisheries skills training. The current technical education, vocational and entrepreneurship training (TEVET) system in Zambia also faces challenges, including developing skills that are relevant to the private sector.

Seasonal loans and marketing training lead to aquaculture success for small-scale farmers in Sierra Leone

In Sierra Leone, Tonkolili District is one of the poorest and most nutritionally insecure regions, with a 25 percent childhood stunting rate. Involving poor farmers in small-scale aquaculture, particularly with a business focus, has huge potential to help combat this problem by increasing fish consumption and incomes.

Yet despite the large number of perennial swamps suited to fish farming, the small-scale aquaculture sector is largely undeveloped, and poor farmers face several barriers when trying to establish a fish farm business.

Postharvest fish losses and unequal gender relations: drivers of the social-ecological trap in the Barotse Floodplain fishery, Zambia

The Barotse Floodplain fishery is an important source of livelihood for economically poor women and men in western Zambia. Current efforts by the Department of Fisheries and the traditional authority to manage the fishery can be characterized as weak. The use of unsustainable fishing practices and overfishing are pervasive.

WorldFish in Tanzania

Fisheries are an important source of food, income and nutrition in Tanzania, where 25% of the country’s population depends on coastal resources or inland lakes for their livelihoods. Over 180,000 people are employed in the fisheries sector, with a further 19,223 people involved in fish farming. WorldFish is working with the Tanzanian government and development partners to increase aquaculture production, reduce postharvest fish losses and enhance the role of fish in nutrition.

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