How do hunter-gatherers learn? The transmission of indigenous knowledge among the Agta of the Philippines

The Agta of the Philippines depend on extensive knowledge of their natural environment for their livelihoods. However, little is known about the transmission of this indigenous ecological knowledge. This paper examines the transmission of knowledge on hunting, fishing and gathering among the Agta in San Mariano, Isabela Province. We used observation, interviewing and knowledge tests as methods of inquiry. Our results show that knowledge transmission happens on-site, is gender-specific and that pathways of knowledge transmission differ per livelihood activity.

Getting beneath the surface in program planning, monitoring and evaluation: Learning from use of participatory action research and theory of change in the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems

Many rural poor and marginalized people strive to make a living in social-ecological systems that are characterized by multiple and often inequitable interactions across agents, scale and space. Uncertainty and inequality in such systems require research and development interventions to be adaptive, support learning and to engage with underlying drivers of poverty. Such complexity-aware approaches to planning, monitoring and evaluating development interventions are gaining strength, yet, there is still little empirical evidence of what it takes to implement them in practice.

Genotype by environment interaction and genetic heterogeneity of environmental variance of body weight at harvest in genetically improved farmed tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) reared in 3 different countries

Establishing breeding programs that improve farmed fish performance across multiple environments is crucial in a globalized aquaculture market.

Gender in Myanmar’s small-scale aquaculture sector

WorldFish’s objective for Myanmar’s MYCulture program is to improve food and income security in the country’s Ayeyarwady Delta and Central Dry Zone regions through the development of small-scale aquaculture To ensure maximum and equitable distribution of the benefits from smallscale aquaculture, the technical component of the program was complemented by a gender and nutrition benchmark study. The aim of the study was to gain an in-depth understanding of existing gender norms and social relations that may influence project outcomes and how they affect men and women differently.

Gender and poverty dimensions in a value chain analysis of milkfish mariculture in Misamis Oriental, Philippines

This paper aims to describe the role of key players in the value chain for milkfish Chanos chanos (Forsskål, 1775) in a mariculture Park in Balingasag, Misamis Oriental in the Philippines with an emphasis on gender dimensions. It also estimates the value additions done by the key players and assesses implications on income distribution. Mapping the chain involved primary data collection through observations, key informant interviews, and focus group discussions. The big, medium and small-scale fish cage operators – 90 % men – are the key players in production.

Gender and household decision-making in a Lao Village: implications for livelihoods in hydropower development

Hydropower development with concomitant changes in water and land regimes often results in livelihood transformation of affected people, entailing changes in intra-household decision-making upon which livelihood strategies are based. Economic factors underlying gender dimensions of household decision-making have been studied rigorously since the 1970s. However, empirical data on gender and decision-making within households, needed for evidence-based action, remain scarce. This is more so in hydropower contexts.

Fisheries in the Ayeyarwady Basin

The Ayeyarwady State of the Basin Assessment (SOBA) is one of the major knowledge outputs of the Ayeyarwady Integrated River Basin Management (AIRBM) Project prepared by Hydro-Informatics Centre (HIC). SOBA aims to inform planning in the Ayeyarwady Basin by providing baseline information on the condition and trends in water and land resources as well as related ecosystem services and the livelihoods and economies of Myanmar that depend on these resources.

Fish, trade and food security: Moving beyond ‘availability’ discourse in marine conservation

The goal of food security increasingly serves as an objective and justification for marine conservation in the global south. In the marine conservation literature this potential link is seldom based upon detailed analysis of the socioeconomic pathways between fish and food security, is often based on limited assumptions about increasing the availability of fish stocks, and downplays the role of trade. Yet, the relationship between fish and food security is multi-faceted and complex, with various local contextual factors that mediate between fish and food security.

Fish to 2050 in the ASEAN region

The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) has emerged as a global fish producer, owing to the rapid growth of aquaculture in Southeast Asia and its large offshore fishing fleet. Fish is a regional commodity that is traded globally, and this region is at the frontline of the global trend toward meeting seafood demand by 2050. Fisheries and aquaculture are increasingly becoming a primary source of protein and micronutrients, foreign exchange, livelihoods and well-being for the population in the region.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Asia