Improving Food Security and Livelihoods of Poor Farming Households (IFSL)

The Improving Food Security and Livelihoods of Poor Farming Households (IFSL) project aims to assist 180,000 smallholder farmers in Bangladesh by improving access to appropriate technical advice and affordable inputs as well as business and marketing support. The project builds on the proven concept of Local Service Providers (LSPs). LSPs are lead farmers who live in communities close to farmers and are selected by target communities and other stakeholders to become their advisors and provide marketing support. Through the project, WorldFish promotes improved fish and shrimp farming techniques as well as mixed cropping systems involving LSPs and farmers groups. It also promotes the adoption of improved fish and shrimp farming techniques, which builds on its ongoing R&D work.

Related Publications


Shomirer upolobdhi (Shomir's enlightenment)

Rajur shofolota (Raju's success)

Khokar shopno (Khoka's dream)

Chaaper pona (Overwintered fry)

Tekshoyi unnoyon e service provision model (Service provision model in sustainable development)

 

 


Flood loss assessment and risk management plan for aquaculture and agriculture in South West Bangladesh

Identifying suitable carp and prawn nursing practices under changing environmental cycle and developing their business model by linking with market and farmers

Health management practices and occupational health hazards in shrimp and prawn farming in South West Bangladesh
   

 

 

Production without medicalisation: Workshop on AMR, One Health and Aquaculture, Dhaka February 12-13th 2019

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR), or the ability of microbes to resist the effects of medicines and other chemicals that are used to control them, presents a formidable threat to health and sustainable development. In particular, aquaculture is recognized as a key site for the emergence and transmission of AMR. The aims of the workshop are to: 1. To share and develop greater understanding of the key practices, disease issues and drivers of resistance risks within Bangladesh and within Bangladeshi aquaculture. 2.

Cost effective aquaponics for food security and income of farming households in coastal Bangladesh

The word ‘aquaponics’ is a combination of ‘aquaculture’ (fish farming) and hydroponics (cultivation in water). It raises both vegetables and fish in a limited space at a relatively low financial cost by adding diversification in culture technique. In this study, experiments were setup with an aim for integrated culture of fish and vegetables in cost effect aquaponics. Pond aquacponics can contribute to increase in food production and will be more popular than traditional only pond fish culture system due to optimal use of the pond.

FISH events: 8th Independent Steering Committee meeting

8th Independent Steering Committee Meeting

The Independent Steering Committee is a governing body that reports directly to the WorldFish Board of Trustees on the performance of the FISH program.

Meeting members consist of scientists, practitioners and representatives from end-user bodies that represent a balance of disciplinary expertise, gender and national diversity.

Tekshoyi unnoyon e service provision model (Service provision model in sustainable development)

This story describes the service provision model introduced by WorldFish through the Improving Food Security and Livelihoods project. The model focuses on local service providers (LSP) and service provider associations (SPAs), which act as a bridge between poor producers, private sector entities and government agencies. SPAs help the poor to enter and benefit from markets. Each LSP organizes input and output market support for around ten groups of 20–25 farming households.

Rajur shofolota (Raju's success)

This story describes Raju’s adoption of best farming practices. He was following conventional farming methods but did not have enough capital to intensify his production and was disappointed with his annual profit. Ali, a local service provider trained by WorldFish, told him how to fatten overwintered carp and prawn at low density and low input and get faster growth. By following Ali’s advice, he found that he did not need to spend a lot of money on feed because he was stocking less fish. He was also able to pay for the feed with his own money until they became a marketable size.

Chaaper pona (Overwintered fry)

This is the story of fish farmer Azim, who overwintered carp fry on his farm and benefited economically. Farmers often underutilize their ponds in the winter. However, as fry do not eat much food or grow because of the low temperature, the pond can be stocked at a high density. When the temperature rises, the fry grow faster to make up the gap and can be sold to the producers of full-sized carp. In addition to economic benefits, this technology brings fish to the market earlier in the year than is typically the case, and overall yield increases as the fish have a longer grow-out period.

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