Discovery and biological relevance of 3,4-didehydroretinol (vitamin A2) in small indigenous fish species and its potential as a dietary source for addressing vitamin A deficiency

Discovered in the late 1920s, 3,4-didehydroretinol (DROL, vitamin A2) plays a significant biological role in freshwater fish. The functions of this vitamin have been investigated but to a far lesser extent than those of retinol (ROL, vitamin A1). A recent study indicating all-trans DROL has 119–127% vitamin A biological activity compared to that of all-trans ROL suggests the significance of DROL for addressing vitamin A deficiency (VAD) in comparison to ROL may be currently overlooked.

Community-based fisheries management approach adopted in Bangladesh

The Community Based Fisheries Management (CBFM) Project, funded by the Ford Foundation (1994-1999) and the UK Government’s Department for International Development (2002- 2006), aimed to promote the sustainable use of, and equitable distribution of benefits from, inland fisheries resources by empowering communities to manage their own resources. The project was implemented by the WorldFish and the Government of Bangladesh’s Department of Fisheries (DoF) with the support of 11 NonGovernmental Organizations (NGOs).

Basic biosecurity manual for tilapia hatchery technicians in Bangladesh

With the onset of Tilapia Lake Virus (TiLV) outbreaks in several Asian countries, WorldFish, in collaboration with Bangladesh’s Department of Fisheries, has developed a program to improve biosecurity in the tilapia industry throughout the country. As the first step, a training program has been designed and conducted to train a group of specialists called Master Trainers on improving tilapia hatchery biosecurity. This manual is a result of that program.

Aquaculture for income and nutrition : Final report

The United States Agency for International Development-Aquaculture for Income and Nutrition (USAID-AIN) project, implemented by WorldFish, emphasized technology development for improved fish strains, and capacity building in hatcheries and nurseries for wider dissemination and uptake among small- and medium-scale household and commercial producers. Improving nutritional benefits from household aquaculture investment was also an important activity of the project.

Annual Report 2017

The CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agri-Food Systems (FISH) is a new CRP that builds on earlier CRPs for Livestock and Fish (L&F) and Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) as well as prior research by WorldFish and the managing partners. Key outcomes from the two flagships of Sustainable Aquaculture and Sustaining Small-scale Fisheries during 2017, including milestones achieved, are summarized in this report.

Training Manual on improved carp/carp-shing poly culture in pond and dyke cropping

Due to inadequate technical knowledge and training in advanced methods of gradually growing carp poly culture, framers are not getting expected yield. From the very beginning of the CSISA-BD project, WoldFish Center has taken initiative to introduce advanced methods in carp poly culture. To do this, the shortage of skilled trainers and training materials, has, particularly, been realized. Presently, a number of manuals on carp poly culture from Department of Fisheries, Bangladesh Fisheries Research Institute, WorldFish Center and different GOs and NGOs are available.

Is Aquaculture pro-poor? Empirical evidence of impacts on fish consumption in Bangladesh

Aquaculture is widely held to contribute to poverty reduction and food security in the Global South, but robust evidence is limited. Using nationally representative data from Bangladesh, this study analyses changes in fish consumption from 2000 to 2010. Rapid expansion of commercial aquaculture pegged down fish prices, resulting in increased fish consumption by extreme poor and moderate poor consumers and those in rural areas. These outcomes are closely linked to the pro-poor nature of national economic growth during this period.

Investing in carp seed quality improvements in homestead aquaculture: lessons from Bangladesh

Lack of quality seed and technical knowhow are considered major constraints to improving aquaculture productivity and profitability in Bangladesh. This paper assesses the outcomes of investments in improving carp seed quality and farmer training, targeting poor and women fish farmers, on the productivity and profitability of homestead aquaculture systems in Southwest Bangladesh.

Increased production of small fish in wetlands combats micronutrient deficiencies in Bangladesh

Increased production of mola and other small fish can be achieved through stock enhancement and sustainable management of natural wetlands. Enhanced fish production can increase consumption and provide nutritional benefits, especially for women and young children, as they suffer from high rates of malnutrition, including micronutrient deficiencies. Mola and other small fish, which are eaten whole, have high contents of vitamins and minerals. In recent years, there has been a reduction in fish production and biodiversity in wetland areas of Bangladesh.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Bangladesh