Assessment of the impact of dissemination of genetically improved Abbassa Nile tilapia strain (GIANT-G9) versus commercial strains in some Egyptian governorates

WorldFish initiated a selective breeding program in Abbassa--Egypt to develop and produce the genetically improved Nile tilapia strain known as “Genetically Improved Abbassa Nile tilapia (GIANT)”, adopting the same technology used for the Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia (GIFT), in Asia. WorldFish provided the Ninth Generation (G9) broodstock of the GIANT to 11 Broodstock Multiplication Centers (BMC’s) in five governorates; these centres then disseminated improved mixed-sex fry to 160 tilapia hatcheries which supplied all-male fry to 1,500 fish farms in 2017.

Assessment of existing and potential feed resources for improving aquaculture production in selected Asian and African countries

This report provides a comprehensive assessment of existing and potential feed resources for improving aquaculture productivity in Bangladesh, Myanmar, Malaysia, Egypt, Nigeria and Zambia. These countries depend heavily on imports for their supply of quality feed ingredients.

Country events: Fish for Africa Innovation Hub: Partners’ and Investors’ Forum

WorldFish will be organizing Fish for Africa Innovation Hub Forum; Partners’ and Investors’ Forum on 17 & 18 June 2019​ at Marriott Hotel, Zamalek, Cairo, Egypt.

The Fish For Africa Innovation Hub will position fish at the heart of discourse, policy and practice in order to support national and regional priorities to meet Africa’s food and nutrition security needs, while supporting the continent’s effort to build a sustainable and inclusive blue economy, rich in equal opportunities benefiting both the people and the environment.

Colorimetric assay for the in vitro evaluation of Saprolegniabiofilm inhibitors

Oomycete infections caused by Saprolegnia species represent an escalating problem in sustainable aquaculture development. This could be attributed to the ban of Malachite green and other carcinogenic agents aims at killing the pathogen. The increase in the incidence of saprolegniosis could also be attributed to its ability to form biofilms. In this study, the authors have investigated the effects of propionic acid (PPA) on reducing the viability of induced Saprolegnia biofilms using colorimetric MTS assay based on the reduction of tetrazolium salts.

Advancing Climate Smart Aquaculture Technologies (ACliSAT)

Although about 43% of the African continent is considered arid and water-poor, it supports the livelihoods of nearly 485 million people. This part of the continent is largely ignored as having potential for aquaculture development, but it has underground water sources (including brackish water aquifers), dams, seasonal ponds and pools from abandoned open-cast mines that all could be used for aquaculture. Furthermore, the abundant solar radiation is an inexpensive and sustainable source of energy for operating closed and open aquaculture systems and for preserving postharvest fish and fish products. Exploiting this potential requires research and development of climate-smart and efficient aquaculture technologies adaptable to water-deficient conditions. The ACliSAT project aims to improve rural livelihood and households’ resilience through aquaculture in Egypt, Ethiopia and Eriteria by sustainably increasing fish production and productivity, nutrition and income generation of fish farmers. The 3-year project will leverage improvements in pond designs and construction for efficient water use. It will also leverage improvements in feed production and feeding technology, as well as adaptation and improved culture practices of Nile Tilapia for different water and temperature conditions. Using these improvements, the project will stimulate growth in emerging and existing aquaculture sectors by sharing knowledge with fish farmers, research centers, extension agencies and service providers on aquaculture technologies and improving the engagement of women and youths in aquaculture activities.

Country Workshop: Tilapia value chains for the poor: testing sustainable practices to meet ‘bottom of the pyramid’ demand.

Incorporating fish consumption which is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, iodine and various vitamins into the daily intake will significantly improve individual health since the human body are not able to produce significant amounts of these essential nutrients. Despite the rich nutritional value of fish, intake by pregnant and lactating women, especially among the poor, is low, and infants and young children are often not fed fish.

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