Capacitating Farmers and Fishers to Manage Climate Risks in South Asia (CaFFSA)

Climate variability has a profound influence on fisheries and agriculture in South Asia, including the service industry and value chains. Progress in weather and sub-seasonal/seasonal forecasting has significantly increased the information available. Yet gaps still exist in the delivery and impact of climate information services, including reliability, uncertainty, scaling and delivery.

Capacitating Farmers and Fishers to Manage Climate Risks in South Asia (CaFFSA)

Climate variability has a profound influence on fisheries and agriculture in South Asia. CaFFSA will innovate in the delivery of climate services to 330,000 farm households in India (Andhra Pradesh and Odisha states) and 150,000 fish farming households in Odisha and Bangladesh (Barisal, Sylhet and Khulna divisions). Timely, reliable and contextualized climate information will profoundly change the climate risk equation in sectors that underpin the food security of millions. The project will build on the existing expertise of CGIAR and partnerships with national agencies, agricultural service and credit institutions to design and deliver scalable products, with an aim to reach more than 600,000 people by 2021.

This work was implemented as part of the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), which is carried out with support from CGIAR Fund Donors and through bilateral funding agreements. This project is led by the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT).

Assam Agribusiness and Rural Transformation Project (APART)

In the Indian state of Assam, capture fisheries and aquaculture provide livelihoods for thousands of rural households, who are directly or indirectly involved in the production and marketing of fish. 

While the current average productivity in ponds is around 1,680 kg/ha/yr, beel fisheries produce less than 500 kg/ha/yr. This is far below the potential productivity as well as below the productivity achieved by other states, including Punjab, Haryana, West Bengal and Andhra Pradesh. In addition, the quality of fish seed produced in the state is sub-standard because of inbreeding and use of undersized broodstock. The chronic shortage of fish feed also impedes farm productivity. 

The Government of Assam (GoA), through the Government of India, has received a loan of USD 200 million from the World Bank for implementation of the Assam Agribusiness and Rural Transformation Project (APART). The project development objective (PDO) is to add value and improve resilience of selected agriculture value chains, focusing on smallholder farmers and agro-entrepreneurs in targeted districts of Assam. Fish has been prioritized as one of the value chains for interventions under APART.

Objectives

WorldFish will provide technical support to the Directorate of Fisheries in the implementation of the project's fisheries sub-component. In line with the PDO, the technical support aims to accomplish the following five broad objectives:

  • Enable sustainable increases in aquaculture production without creating adverse socioeconomic or environmental impacts (sustainable intensification of aquaculture);
  • Secure and enhance the contribution of small-scale fisheries to food security in Assam (increasing the diversity and productivity of beels);
  • Increase the availability, access and consumption of nutrient-rich, safe fish, especially for women of reproductive age, infants and young children (improving fish value chains and human nutrition);
  • Develop and promote climate-resilient technologies in support of sustainable aquaculture and small-scale fisheries (climate -resilient/climate-smart aquaculture technologies);
  • Promote gender-transformative approaches in support of sustainable aquaculture and beel fisheries in Assam (gender-transformative approaches in aquaculture).

World Brackishwater Aquaculture Conference

BRAQCON 2019 will provide a unique platform for people involved in brackishwater aquaculture and fisheries, nationally and internationally. Sharing of experience and research advancements in the frontier areas would facilitate maximum utilisation, cultivation, conservation and development of aquatic resources. The conference would elicit interest among young researchers and scientists to undertake studies and research to further open up new blue growth avenues for a better world.

Boom and bust in Andhra Pradesh: Development and transformation in India's domestic aquaculture value chain

India is the world's second largest producer of farmed freshwater fish. The state of Andhra Pradesh (AP) is by far the most important producer of fish in India. Since the late 1970s, fish culture in AP has undergone a boom (first with Indian major carps, then pangasius), resulting in expansion of pond area to 142,000 ha, and massive increases in inland farmed fish production, to 1.5 million tons. Unregulated growth of carp farming has caused severe environmental conflicts, leading to the demolition of 39,000 ha of ponds by the state.

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