Gender and household decision-making in a Lao Village: implications for livelihoods in hydropower development

Hydropower development with concomitant changes in water and land regimes often results in livelihood transformation of affected people, entailing changes in intra-household decision-making upon which livelihood strategies are based. Economic factors underlying gender dimensions of household decision-making have been studied rigorously since the 1970s. However, empirical data on gender and decision-making within households, needed for evidence-based action, remain scarce. This is more so in hydropower contexts.

Coping with resettlement: A livelihood adaptation analysis in the Mekong River basin

A major driver of change in the Mekong River basin relates to hydropower development and the consequent changes in landscape and natural resource access regime that it induces. In this paper, we examine how the livelihoods of resettlers evolve following resettlement, and examine the determinants of that process. The study takes place in the context of the Theun Hinboun Expansion Project in Lao PDR. Based on longitudinal household surveys conducted before resettlement as well as 1, 2, and 3 years after resettlement, we identify the process of livelihood adaptation in resettled communities.

Redistribution of water use and benefits among hydropower affected communities in Lao PDR

In this paper, we assess how resettlement and changes in water access have altered livelihoods of local communities upstream of the Theun Hinboun Expansion Project in Lao PDR. Based on household surveys conducted both before and after resettlement, we estimate changes in water use and benefits among households of 4 resettled villages.

The importance of the fish resource in the Mekong River and examples of best practices

The Mekong is an exceptional river in many ways. In terms of fish biodiversity, it is the world’s second richest river after the Amazon (www.fishbase. org). With 6 to 18% of the global freshwater fish catch, it is also home to the largest freshwater fisheries in the world. The productive Mekong fisheries are essential to the food security of the 60 million people of the Lower Mekong Basin. Fish contributes 81% of the population’s protein intake in Cambodia and 48% in Laos. Mekong inland fisheries also provide employment to 1.6 of the 14 million Cambodians.

Inland community fisheries in southern Laos

Since 1993, a series of aquatic resource co-management workshops have been on-going, established by the Lao government and fisheries agencies for village farmers in the Khong District in southern Laos, aiming for a sustainable use of inland capture fisheries resources. This article describes the mechanics involved and the participants' perspective, as well as reporting the outcomes and progress of the workshops so far.

Fisheries, nutrition and regional development pathways: reasserting food rights

As hydropower developments are accelerated, particularly along the the Mekong mainstream, debates are looming over how to address the loss of abundant fisheries that are so important to local livelihoods.The authors discuss what is at stake and what might be lost by considering how fisheries contribute to development that meets the needs of the people of Mekong. They emphasise the importance of food sovereignty as a local issue in the discourse about trade-offs in water decision-making.

Community management of Mekong River resources in Laos

The Mekong River is one of Asia's greatest rivers. It is the lifeblood of millions of small-scale farmers and fishers in China, Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam. In the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR), the river is particularly important because for the landlocked country, the Mekong is "the Sea of Laos." In southern Lao PDR, fisheries for native fish species constitute an extremely important source of subsistence protein and income for local people.

Aquaculture distance education in Lao PDR.

Through the Aquaculture Outreach Program, the Asian Institute of Technology (AID in Bangkok, Thailand, operates in rural developmental projects in NE Thailand and in other Indo-Chinese countries. Research and extension are among the activities carried out in partnership with a large number of institutions, line agencies and tertiary education institutions. Ten universities and agricultural colleges in the region are supported by institutional capacity building and human resource development programs.

Wetlands governance in the Mekong Region: country reports on the legal-institutional framework and economic valuation of aquatic resources

Wetlands are central to the livelihoods of rural communities through out the Mekong Region, providing vital functions and services that support the rural economy, ensure food security for the most vulnerable membrs of society, and underpin the prospects for national development. Proper appreciation of the importance of wetlands has been hampered by inadequate information and awareness of their uses, particularly among development planners, as well as legal and institutional frameworks that are often fragmented and poorly enforced.

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