Gender-inclusive facilitation for community-based marine resource management. An addendum to “Community-based marine resource management in Solomon Islands: A facilitators guide” and other guides for CBRM

People who rely on a natural resource should be central to decisions about how that resource is used and managed. This principle is at the core of community-based resource management (CBRM) and other forms of collaborative management or co-management. When management partners or facilitators engage communities, they must use deliberate, thoughtful and reflexive strategies to reduce the risk of exacerbating existing power imbalances.

FISH events: Visioning for a Learning Hub of Excellence

WorldFish researchers from Solomon Islands, Timor Leste and partner organization, James Cook University are meeting next week at the Nusa Tupe Research Station in Western Province of Solomon Islands.

For 20 years, WorldFish research in the Solomon Islands has sought to improve the performance of fisheries and aquaculture for food security and human wellbeing. Insights from this work are shared across the Pacific region.

Strengthening and scaling community-based approaches to Pacific coastal fisheries management in support of the New Song

In the small island developing states of the Pacific, catching, trading and eating fish are central to the way of life and local and national economies. Local and external pressures on marine resources, and high reliance on fisheries as a livelihood, mean that improving and sustaining fisheries benefits is a key pathway to improve human wellbeing and contribute to food and nutrition security. This project aims to improve the wellbeing of Pacific coastal communities through more resilient fisheries as a foundation. The project contributes to the Pacific Community's New Song strategy, which calls for a stronger, co-ordinated approach to developing and managing coastal fisheries. The project aims to: (1) strengthen Pacific institutions to implement the New Song for coastal fisheries; (2) improve and scale out CBFM in Kiribati, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu; (3) improve the opportunities, viability and performance of livelihoods in support of CBFM initiatives; (4) increase social and gender equity in coastal fisheries governance, utilization and benefit distribution; and (5) promote food and nutrition security in the Pacific food system through improved management and use of fish. The project builds on community-based management and multi-level governance efforts in preceding projects led by WorldFish with national and regional partners.

Tales and stories of dugongs from Solomon Islands

In Solomon Islands, seagrass is found in almost every province. Large seagrass beds can be found in Western, Choiseul and Malaita provinces, and Lau lagoon contains the largest area of seagrass in the country. Seagrass beds are one of the most valuable habitats for Solomon Islanders. Fishers use them as fishing grounds, while farmers use them for mulching their gardens to enrich the soil and help improve their yield. Dugongs are important for keeping coastal habitats healthy, and they are a valuable source of food. In Solomon Islands, dugongs have high cultural value in many communities.

Conservation strategy for dugongs and seagrass habitats in Solomon Islands

This strategy provides direction for implementation of priority actions that are necessary for achieving effective conservation and management of dugong and seagrass habitats. It complements the Fisheries Management Act 2015 and the Wildlife Protection and Management Act (2017) ensuring sustainability of the resources. It also highlights the government’s commitment to continue to collaborate with international and national partners and communities in ensuring dugongs and healthy seagrass meadows are available for the future generations.

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