Senior officials and aquaculture advisors from Solomon Islands’ Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources visited Timor-Leste in April 2018 to learn about WorldFish’s aquaculture activities, including genetically improved farmed tilapia (GIFT) seed production and dissemination. 

In the face of rising fish production costs such as feed and land rental, Egyptian farmers are looking for innovative and sustainable ways to ensure higher productivity and profitability.

As the world progresses towards an uncertain future, the assumptions we have are incredibly important to consider. Join Cynthia McDougall in an exploration of Zero Sum situations where one must lose for another to gain in the areas of gender equality, and how the future changes everything.

WorldFish scientists worked with Save the Children, as part of the Rice Field Fisheries project, on implementing their NOURISH project to promote fish powder for children’s nutrition. NOURISH created a series of short films for television, one of which deals with covers a range of child care and feeding practices – including fish powder. View the TV Spot here.

 

Gareth Johnstone, the Director General of WorldFish, took time out to talk about International Women’s Day and gender in the Center.

The Mekong River in Cambodia’s Stung Treng Province has been designated a wetland of international importance under the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands. It is a unique environment, with deep pools that harbor young fish and seasonally flooded forests where numerous species of fish go to spawn. 

 

In the young half-island nation of Timor-Leste, fisheries are small-scale and have low catch rates, meaning fish is an underexploited source of nutrition and protein that can help combat the country’s high rate of malnutrition. 

By 2025, African governments hope that 40% of the total fish consumed in Africa will be met by aquaculture. Ongoing research and training provided by the WorldFish-run Africa Aquaculture Research and Training Center in Egypt will be critical to achieving this goal. Since opening in 1998, the center has developed a faster-growing strain of Nile tilapia and trained over 1690 individuals from 105 countries in aquaculture techniques.

In this five-minute interview, Dr. Blake Ratner, Director General of WorldFish, explains the organization’s six-year strategy (2017–2022) to deliver on its mission – to strengthen livelihoods and enhance food and nutrition security by improving fisheries and aquaculture. WorldFish pursues this through research partnerships focused on sustainable aquaculture, resilient small-scale fisheries, and enhancing the contributions of fish to nutrition of the poor in developing countries.

In Bangladesh, many poor fishers struggle to cope during the government-imposed hilsa fishing ban. Boosting the resilience of the communities whose livelihoods depend on hilsa (also known as ilish), the national fish of Bangladesh, is therefore the goal of the USAID-funded Enhanced Coastal Fisheries in Bangladesh (ECOFISH Bangladesh) project. Since 2014, the project has established 280 hilsa conservation groups in 81 villages, and is training women in new livelihood activities such as vegetable gardening.

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