To help rural farmers access information about aquaculture, the USAID-funded Aquaculture for Income and Nutrition (AIN) project has trained fish feed and seed suppliers to become local service providers (LSP). Since 2015, over 1275 individuals have started operating as LSPs, by giving free training and consultations to local farmers in Bangladesh.

Every year during the hilsa breeding months, normally September and October, it is illegal to catch juvenile or mother hilsa, the national fish of Bangladesh. To help poor and rural fishing families comply and cope with the ban, the USAID-funded ECOFishBD project provides training and support to fishing families to farm fish in homestead ponds, grow vegetables for home consumption and form savings groups.

After the 2004 tsunami destroyed the aquaculture industry in Aceh, Indonesia, an area famous for shrimp, small-scale farmers struggled to rebuild their businesses. Now, as part of the IDH-funded Sustaining Shrimp Farming in Aceh project, WorldFish and partners are working with the Aceh Aquaculture Cooperative, formed in 2013, to establish a sustainable business model for the farming of black tiger shrimp, a premium product in foreign markets.

From 2010 to 2015, the USAID-funded Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia (CSISA) worked in six hubs in Bangladesh to fight food security by improving agricultural and aquaculture productivity and promoting technology innovation. This outcome video highlights the project’s successes, including higher aquaculture yields, improved farmer access to better quality seed, and greater household consumption of fish and vegetables.

A quiet revolution is happening in the ponds of shrimp farmers in Bangladesh. Since 2012, commercial shrimp farmers have increased production by 21 percent to 280 kg per hectare, the result of following better management practices (BMP) and using virus-free shrimp seed. This is part of the USAID-funded Aquaculture and Income for Nutrition project, which has trained over 50,000 commercial farmers in BMP since 2012.

In poor households in Bangladesh, women participate in aquaculture much less than men. To increase women’s involvement, the USAID-funded Aquaculture for Income and Nutrition project has introduced gill nets, which enable women to quickly and easily harvest small fish from their household pond. This has helped increase households' access to and consumption of fish.   

In Timor-Leste, reef fish stocks are dwindling, increasing the pressure faced by fishing-dependent households. Inshore fish aggregating devices (FADs) are helping combat this problem, explains WorldFish Senior Scientist David Mills, by increasing oceanic fish supply and protecting vital reefs.

Following the the 2004 tsunami many in Aceh, Indonesia are rebuilding their lives with the help of aquaculture. WorldFish works with partners including Ecohub, the producer of this video, to champion small scale aquaculture providing social and economic protection for many affected communities.  

Aquaculture is increasingly recognized for its real and potential role in improving income, nutrition and overall food security in developing countries. But a recent WorldFish study has found that the distribution of these benefits to the poor and marginalized is influenced by socio-cultural dynamics, such as gender, race or ethnicity. In this edition of the WorldFish podcast, we are joined by Senior Scientist Jharendu Pant and Research Analyst Surendran Rajaratnam to discuss why that's the case.

In Cambodia, small fish are abundant in rice field fisheries and are an important part of a healthy diet. Small fish provide micronutrients such as vitamin A, zinc, iron and calcium that are needed for cognitive and physical development, especially in children. 

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