Nepalese farmers, fish hatchery and nursery owners, feed mill operators and aquaculture experts have visited Bangladesh to learn new industry technologies.
 
Organized by the Agriculture and Nutrition Extension Project (ANEP), the technology exchange has helped increase productivity and improve incomes and food security for poor farmers.
 
Since 2012, the aquaculture component of the ANEP project has improved incomes and nutrition for more than 1,900 households in Bangladesh and 600 households in Nepal.

Helping the people of Stung Treng Province imagine hydropower relocation. Documenting the study tour of Cambodian group from Stung Treng to Lao project site.

The Ramsar site in Stung Treng province, Cambodia is home to more than 10,000 people from 21 villages as well as significant numbers of seasonal fishers who came to the area following the annual fish migrations. Despite richness of the biodiversity in the area, there is widespread poverty and food insecurity. Over exploitation of natural resources, the use of destructive fishing methods and upstream development of hydropower dams have reduced biodiversity and impacted the livelihoods of the people living in the area.

A slideshow about WorldFish in Africa.

Gender inequality doesn’t make sense on any level. Promoting gender equality can reduce extreme poverty and hunger and boost shared prosperity for girls and boys, women and men, around the world.

For agricultural research to have development impact, farmers should be involved in the process as co-researchers. A new study shows that when farmers are in-charge of innovation and research, it can lead to lasting change on many levels.

The Climate Smart Farm Project tested a range of possible adaptations to climate variability and change in southwest Bangladesh. One such adaptation is a cyclone and flooding resistant home designed to reduce the loss of food and income in a storm's aftermath - stopping a natural hazard from becoming a natural disaster.

Women fish retailers in Egypt are often forced to pay unofficial fees for their roadside market stalls. Exposure to the elements affects the women’s health and causes their produce to spoil, limiting their income. An interactive theatre project has helped boost the confidence and ability of these women to lobby their local government for retail licenses to protect their safety and rights as workers.

A new report by WorldFish and the Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies proves conclusively that growth in aquaculture has led to greater fish consumption among the poorest consumers in Bangladesh.

Villagers around Lake Victoria face declining resources. Increasing competition over fish resources has the potential to  immobilize the fisheries management process. A WorldFish led dialogue process called "Collaborating for Resilience" helped spur community-led actions linking public health, sanitation and environmental conservation - and how that social innovation is spreading. Find out more at http://coresilience.org

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