Gender strategy brief: A gender transformative approach to research in development in aquatic agricultural systems

In July 2011, the CGIAR approved the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) in recognition of the importance of these systems and the potential they provide for reducing poverty. Our goal is to reduce poverty and improve food security for people whose livelihoods depend on aquatic agricultural systems.

AAS 2013 Annual report

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) takes an innovative approach to improving the lives of poor and vulnerable rural households. It aims to directly benefit some 6 million people (in Asia’s mega deltas, the island systems of the Pacific and Southeast Asia, and Africa’s inland waters), and through scaling with partners to reach 15 million more. By sharing its learning, the program aims to extend the benefits of its approaches to many more people living in other complex systems.

Evaluation of the contribution of fisheries and aquaculture to food security in developing countries

Fish contain important nutrients such as essential fatty acids, iron, zinc, calcium, vitamin A and vitamin C. Production of freshwater fish depends on the strategic application of various management techniques. The demand for fish products has increased beyond the natural supply, resulting in a high pressure on fisheries. Development of aquaculture is necessary for a rapid growth in fish production. A number of constraints hamper the development of aquaculture.

Small scale fisheries in the neotrophics: research and management issues

The lack of comprehensive regional treatments of small scale fisheries and the need for improved information for management purposes of this sector in the region are emphasized. Estimating total catches, mapping the seasonal deployment of fleets and quantifying their fishing effort as well as computing catch per unit effort and cost per unit catch for all major gears/species are crucial. In addition, the need to understand oftenly neglected issues, such as the mobility of fisherfolk in and out of the fishery and the role of women in production, distribution and trade are emphasized.

Report on involvement of women in shrimp technology development: shrimp quality support project 2, implemented by WorldFish Center

This report focused on the scope and promotion of women participation in shrimp value chain and find out the factors of gender equity and enhancement of women empowerment along with the value chain of the shrimp industry.

Women's unpaid labor in the small scale fisheries sector in Malaysia

Recent studies have shown that women are actively involved in the small scale fisheries sector in Malaysia working very often without pay in the family businesses. Activities carried out by women include small-scale fish processing, net mending, cleaning and gutting fish, fish vending, feed preparation and feeding fish in aquaculture projects. Planners and policy makers must recognize the unpaid work for women so that the needs of women will not be left behind in development planning.

Women in the December 26 Tsunami: how have they coped; how can we help?

Fishing communities around the Indian Ocean were severely affected by the December 2004 tsunamis. Programs for rebuilding coastal fisheries livelihoods need to address the pre-tsunami situation that was characterized by overfishing and degraded natural resources. Adopting appropriate strategies to ensure sustainable livelihoods will require community involvement, as well as cross-sectoral, integrated planning and management at ascending government levels.

Networth: research with women fish farmers in Bangladesh

A narration of the collaborative work between ICLARM fish farming / culture program in Bangladesh with the Bangladesh Fisheries Research Institute on potential use of seasonal ponds as small scale fish ponds. The ponds could be used to increase fish production in Bangladesh up to 80%. The women could manage the fish culture and in the process of doing so, contribute to household income, provide employment and improve family nutrition.

CBFM-2 International conference on community based approaches to fisheries management

The CBFM international conference held on 6th and 7th March 2007 in Dhaka, Bangladesh brought together policy makers, scientists and development practioners from all over the world to share experiences in co-mangement of complex wetland environments. This booklet includes abstracts of papers presented at the conference.

The role of gender in economic activities with special reference to women's participation and empowerment in rural Bangladesh

Bangladesh is known as a predominantly male-dominated society with traditional and religious beliefs that restrict women’s mobility and participation in economic and social activities. This article is based on national rural representative household-level data collected in 1987 and 2000 from 62 villages in Bangladesh jointly conducted by the International Rice Research Institute and Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies. First, this article depicts patterns of women’s work and analyzes the factors that influence the gender division of labor.

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