Nutrition approaches in the Fish for Livelihoods project

This document provides a common understanding among stakeholders (staff from implementing partners, WorldFish staff, donors, communities) on the approaches undertaken throughout the project. These approaches are based on experience from other WorldFish projects, both in Myanmar and in neighboring countries. This document serves only as a guide, so feedback and recommendations from stakeholders are welcome.

Fish for Livelihoods: SIS partial harvest (Burmese version)

This poster highlights the benefits of eating Small Indigineous Fish (SIS), how to harvest it, and the benefits of growing them with other fish species. The benefits of the partial harvesting that they don't need to spend access money rather they get extra income. It gives information about the vitamins, protein, calcium, and other minerals they can gain from the SIS consumption.

Fish for Livelihoods: Small Indigenous Species (SIS) Q&A (Burmese version)

This poster captures the question and answers on where to find the SIS, how to raise the SIS, the possibilites of growing it with other fish species including Rohu and Mrigal. What is SIS partial harvesting, frequency of harvesting, and potential benefits of it. The period of harvesting should be betwen one to two months after the SIS transferred from the natural sources.

Partnership for Aquaculture Development in Timor-Leste: Looking back, looking forward

In 2012, the National Directorate of Fisheries and Aquaculture (NDFA), Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries (MAF) Timor-Leste, developed the National Aquaculture Development Strategy (NADS) 2012–2030 with technical assistance from WorldFish. The New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (NZ MFAT) provided funding to support implementation of NADS through the Partnership for Aquaculture Development in Timor-Leste (PADTL) project (2014–2019).

Genetically Improved Rohu (Labeo rohita) for Bangladesh

The WorldFish Rohu Genetic Improvement Program aims to substantially increase aquaculture productivity in Bangladesh by developing and disseminating rapidly growing rohu to farmers. Genetically improved rohu seed will be available in Bangladesh beginning in 2020. These fish are expected to grow 20%–30% more rapidly than currently available seed. WorldFish expects to further improve the rohu growth rate by an average of 5%–10% every 2 years—the age at which new genetically superior parents can be selected and spawned.

Integrating fish, roots, tubers and bananas in food systems: Opportunities and constraints

This working paper is a collaboration between two CGIAR Research Programs (CRPs): Fish Agri-Food Systems (FISH) and Roots, Tubers and Bananas (RTB). It documents linkages between fish, roots, tubers and bananas (RTB crops) within food systems; identifies opportunities for strengthened integration in production systems, animal feed and nutritional products; and identifies constraints and research gaps, and provides policy recommendations that support nutrition-sensitive food systems.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Sustainable aquaculture