A rights-based perspective on adaptive capacity

Whilst it is increasingly recognised that socio-political contexts shape climate change adaptation decisions and actions at all scales, current modes of development typically fail to recognise or adequately challenge these contexts where they constrain capacity to adapt. To address this failing, the authors consider how a rights-based approach broadens understanding of adaptive capacity while directing attention towards causes of exclusion and marginalisation.

Navigating change: Second-generation challenges of small-scale fisheries co-management in the Philippines and Vietnam

Early efforts to apply the concept of fisheries co-management in Southeast Asia focused primarily on building the effectiveness of local management institutions and advocating the merits of the approach so that it would be applied in new sites, while gradually learning and adapting to a range of obstacles in practice. Today, with co-management widely embraced by the research community and adopted as policy by an increasing number of governments, a second-generation perspective has emerged.

Multiple water use as an approach for increased basin productivity and improved adaptation: a case study from Bangladesh

This study, supported by the Challenge Program Water and Food (CPWF-Project 35), demonstrates the case of multiple-use of water through seasonal aquaculture interventions for improved rice–fish production systems in the Bangladesh floodplains. The project focused on community-based fish culture initiatives, increasingly adopted in the agro-ecological zones of the major floodplains of the Padma, Testa, and Brahmaputra basin. The productivity of water and fish is used as an indicator to explain this case.

Mangrove ecosystem services and payments for blue carbon in Solomon Islands

The AusAID Development Research Project: Poverty Alleviation, Mangrove Conservation and Climate Change: Carbon offsets as payment for mangrove ecosystem services in Solomon Islands (# 49892) was designed to evaluate the potential for mangrove carbon revenue programs in Solomon Islands. The approach was to address three main questions: (1) How are mangrove ecosystem goods and services currently used and valued by coastal populations with a high reliance on a subsistence economy? (2) What is the total carbon stock held in mangrove ecosystems?

Limits to resilience from livelihood diversification and social capital in lake social-ecological systems

Diversity of both social networks and livelihood sources plays a central role in determining the sustainability of natural resource use and resilience of social–ecological systems, not least in resource-dependent economies. Yet the types of social capital and characteristics of diversity are not well understood. Here we examine social capital and livelihood diversification strategies in dynamic lakeshore social–ecological systems in Uganda adapting to climate variability and change.

Towards integrated island management: lessons from Lau, Malaita, for the implementation of a national approach to resource management in Solomon Islands: final report

Solomon Islands has recently developed substantial policy aiming to support inshore fisheries management, conservation, climate change adaptation and ecosystem approaches to resource management. A large body of experience in community based approaches to management has developed but “upscaling” and particularly the implementation of nation-wide approaches has received little attention so far.

Vulnerability and resilience of remote rural communities to shocks and global changes: empirical analysis from Solomon Islands

Successful management of socio-ecological systems not only requires the development and field-testing of robust and measurable indices of vulnerability and resilience but also improved understanding of the contextual factors that influence societal capacity to adapt to change. We present the results of an analysis conducted in three coastal communities in Solomon Islands.

Responses to climate change: adaptation pathways to change

This project, Responding to Climate Change Using an Adaptation Pathways and Decision-making Approach, funded by the Asian Development Bank (ADB), aims to strengthen coastal and marine resource management in the Coral Triangle of the Pacific, by assisting communities in Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Timor Leste and Vanuatu to develop their own climate change adaptation implementation plans.

Understanding adaptation and transformation through indigenous practice: the case of the Guna of Panama

Resilience is emerging as a promising vehicle for improving management of social-ecological systems that can potentially lead to more sustainable arrangements between environmental and social spheres. Central to an understanding of how to support resilience is the need to understand social change and its links with adaptation and transformation. Our aim is to contribute to insights about and understanding of underlying social dynamics at play in social-ecological systems.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Adaptation