Gleaner, fisher, trader, processor: understanding gendered employment in fisheries and aquaculture

Most research on gender difference or inequities in capture fisheries and aquaculture in Africa and the Asia-Pacific focuses on the gender division of labour. Emerging research on globalization, market changes, poverty and trends in gendered employment within this sector reveals the need to move beyond this narrow perspective. If gleaning and post-harvesting activities were enumerated, the fisheries and aquaculture sector might well turn out to be female sphere.

Genetics of adaptation in rainbow trout: a multi disciplinary approach

Ability of fish to adapt to changing environments and stressors is a key trait for breeders, especially when they sell eggs or young fish all over the world. So far, this ability has not been introduced in any breeding program. Indeed, sensibility to environment is difficult to describe. Most often, either physiological traits, or behavioral traits are considered but each of them represent only a partial representation of the situation.

Genetic improvement programs for red tilapia Oreochromis spp in Asia

Red tilapia (Oreochromis spp) has become popular in Asian countries due to its greater economic value relative to Nile tilapia. As there is a growing demand for quality seed of this species, the WorldFish Center has initiated a genetic improvement program for red tilapia in Thailand and another one in Malaysia. The ultimate aim of the project is to develop a genetically improved strain of red tilapia with uniform red coloration, high survival and good adaptation to local environment.

The future is now: how scenarios can help Senegalese and Mauritanian fisheries adapt to climate change

Localized changes in the productivity of marine and inland waters induced by climate change will pose new challenges to the fishery and the aquaculture sectors in West Africa. However, climate change does not occur in isolation of other drivers of change: processes of environmental, economic and social change can affect the fishery sector, potentially creating additional vulnerability to climate change. Scenarios are a useful tool to explore uncertainties and understand non-climatic drivers of change.

Fuelling the decline in UK fishing communities?

Volatile fuel prices are a threat to the viability of UK fishing communities. The economic and social impacts of rising fuel costs for fishers and communities in southwest England are examined. Fuel prices doubled between early 2007 and mid-2008, whereas fish prices remained relatively stable throughout as a result of the price-setting power of seafood buyers. It was the fishers who absorbed the increased costs, resulting in significant loss of income, reduced job security, and problems in recruiting crew.

Fisheries and aquaculture in a changing climate

This policy brief highlights the key issues to ensure that decision makers and climate change negotiators are aware of and understand the changes and their impacts, and the opportunities for adaptation and mitigation in aquatic ecosystems, fisheries and aquaculture at the UNFCCC COP-15 in Copenhagen in December 2009 and in national and local responses to climate change. The brief also reflects the consensus of 19 concerned international and regional agencies.

Climate variability and the Peruvian scallop fishery: the role of formal institutions in resilience building

Peru experiences recurrent ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) events during which the Peruvian bay scallop (Argopecten purpuratus) undergoes substantial changes in its stock size. In the North of the country strong warm ENSO events are synonymous with floods and river discharges that negatively affect scallop biomass, while in the South increased sea surface temperatures lead to an increase in stock size.

Climate change, small-scale fisheries and smallholder aquaculture

Fisheries and aquaculture both contribute to meeting the Millennium Development Goals but vulnerability to climate change threatens the contribution that they make to development. Impacts of climate change on small-scale fisheries are of great relevance to poverty reduction. Poverty undermines the resilience of social-ecological systems such as fisheries. The majority of the world’s 250 million fisherfolk lives in areas that are highly exposed to climate change.

Climate change and fisheries: vulnerability and adaptation in Cambodia [Khmer version]

Cambodia is highly vulnerable to the effects of climate change on fisheries, which supply livelihoods for millions and up to 80% of all animal protein in the diet. Most fisheries are highly variable by nature and subject to environmental change, including climate change. Hydropower dam construction, intensified fishing pressure and macroeconomic drivers are likely to affect Cambodian fisheries more immediately and visibly than climate change.

Climate change and fisheries: vulnerability and adaptation in Cambodia

Cambodia is highly vulnerable to the effects of climate change on fisheries, which supply livelihoods for millions and up to 80% of all animal protein in the diet. Most fisheries are highly variable by nature and subject to environmental change, including climate change. Hydropower dam construction, intensified fishing pressure and macroeconomic drivers are likely to affect Cambodian fisheries more immediately and visibly than climate change.

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