World Brackishwater Aquaculture Conference

BRAQCON 2019 will provide a unique platform for people involved in brackishwater aquaculture and fisheries, nationally and internationally. Sharing of experience and research advancements in the frontier areas would facilitate maximum utilisation, cultivation, conservation and development of aquatic resources. The conference would elicit interest among young researchers and scientists to undertake studies and research to further open up new blue growth avenues for a better world.

A systematic quantitative literature review of aquaculture genetic resource access and benefit sharing

The Convention on Biological Diversity provides a framework for countries to implement laws regulating the access, use and exchange of genetic resources, including how users and providers share the benefits from their use. While the international community has been preoccupied with resolving the unintended effects of access and benefit sharing (ABS) on domestication in agriculture for the past 25 years, its far-reaching consequences for global aquaculture has only recently dawned on policymakers, aquaculture producers and researchers.

Status of Fish Aggregating Device fishery in the River Titas of Bangladesh

This paper aims to examine the status of Fish Aggregating Device (Katha) fishery in the river Titas in Bangladesh and development of an alternative Katha fishery management strategy. All Fish Aggregating Devices (Kathas) were recorded through a census survey. Fish catch monitoring facilitated through a regular catch survey of Katha/gear/team in operation. The study employed data collected from the river Titas in Brahmanbaria district of Bangladesh from 1997 to 2002.

Biodiversity of the Ayeyarwady Basin

The Ayeyarwady State of the Basin Assessment (SOBA) is one of the major knowledge outputs of the Ayeyarwady Integrated River Basin Management (AIRBM) Project prepared by Hydro-Informatics Centre (HIC). SOBA aims to inform planning in the Ayeyarwady Basin by providing baseline information on the condition and trends in water and land resources as well as related ecosystem services and the livelihoods and economies of Myanmar that depend on these resources.

Aquatic habitats in the Ayeyarwady Basin and their biodiversity

This document provides a description of the general freshwater habitats found throughout the Ayeyarwady Basin. With a wide range of riverine and wetland habitats and high levels of species biodiversity, the Ayeyarwady River remains an ecologically important area and one of the world’s biodiversity hotspots. However, the habitats of the Ayeyarwady River, from the mountain’s rivers in the Eastern Himalayas to the Outer Delta Islands, are increasingly being subjected to intense and growing pressure from habitat loss, degradation and fragmentation, and over-exploitation of natural resources.

Trading-off fish biodiversity, food security, and hydropower in the Mekong River Basin

The Mekong River Basin, site of the biggest inland fishery in the world, is undergoing massive hydropower development. Planned dams will block critical fish migration routes between the river's downstream floodplains and upstream tributaries. Here we estimate fish biomass and biodiversity losses in numerous damming scenarios using a simple ecological model of fish migration. Our framework allows detailing trade-offs between dam locations, power production, and impacts on fish resources.

Increased production of small fish in wetlands combats micronutrient deficiencies in Bangladesh

Increased production of mola and other small fish can be achieved through stock enhancement and sustainable management of natural wetlands. Enhanced fish production can increase consumption and provide nutritional benefits, especially for women and young children, as they suffer from high rates of malnutrition, including micronutrient deficiencies. Mola and other small fish, which are eaten whole, have high contents of vitamins and minerals. In recent years, there has been a reduction in fish production and biodiversity in wetland areas of Bangladesh.

The importance of the fish resource in the Mekong River and examples of best practices

The Mekong is an exceptional river in many ways. In terms of fish biodiversity, it is the world’s second richest river after the Amazon (www.fishbase. org). With 6 to 18% of the global freshwater fish catch, it is also home to the largest freshwater fisheries in the world. The productive Mekong fisheries are essential to the food security of the 60 million people of the Lower Mekong Basin. Fish contributes 81% of the population’s protein intake in Cambodia and 48% in Laos. Mekong inland fisheries also provide employment to 1.6 of the 14 million Cambodians.

Food security and the coral Triangle Initiative

The Asia-Pacific's Coral Triangle is defined by its extremely high marine biodiversity. Over one hundred million people living in its coastal zones use this biodiversity to support their livelihoods. Hundreds of millions more derive nutritious food directly from the region's marine resources and through local, regional and global trade. Biodiversity and its values to society are threatened by demographic and habitat change, rising demand, intensive harvesting and climate change.

Fish resources in Cambodia (2001-2011)

Cambodian inland fish resources are part of the Mekong system. With 781 known freshwater and brackish fish species, the Mekong Basin has the second highest fish biodiversity in the world after the Amazon Basin in South America. Cambodia itself features 461 freshwater species, plus 468 marine species and 26 species found in both environments. This makes 955 fish species in total.

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