2012 Publications catalog

This catalog lists publications published by WorldFish, CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) and papers contributed by the Center’s scientists in 2012. It reflects the outcomes of research carried out in collaboration with partners from 27 countries through the generous support from international investors. The majority of which are members of the CGIAR.

2012 Annual report

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems is a multi-year research initiative launched in July 2011. It is designed to pursue community-based approaches to agricultural research and development that target the poorest and most vulnerable rural households in aquatic agricultural systems. Led by WorldFish, a member of the CGIAR Consortium, the program is partnering with diverse organizations working at local, national and global levels to help achieve impacts at scale.

2011 Publications catalog

This catalog lists publications published by The WorldFish Center and papers contributed by the Center’s scientists in 2011. It reflects the outcomes of research carried out in collaboration with partners from 27 countries through the generous support from international investors. The majority of which are members of the CGIAR.

Program proposal

The overall goal of the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems is to improve the well-being of aquatic agricultural system-dependent peoples. The Program will focus initially on three aquatic agricultural systems: (i) Asia‘s mega deltas, targeting Bangladesh and Cambodia; (ii) Asia-Pacific islands, targeting the Philippines and Solomons; and (iii) African freshwater systems, targeting first Zambia, then Uganda and Mali.

More meat, milk and fish by and for the poor --- CGIAR Research Program 3.7 - Fish

As a member of the Consultative Group for International Agricultural Research (CGIAR). The WorldFish Center will partner with several other CGIAR Centers in the CGIAR Research Program 3.7 "More meat, milk and fish by and for the poor". The focus of research for the fish components of the Program are on technology platform and integrated value chain research.

Landscape level characterization of seasonal floodplains under community based aquaculture: illustrating a case of the Ganges and the Mekong Delta

The project 'Community-based Fish Culture in Seasonal Floodplains' (henceforward the community-based fish culture project), CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food, aims to enhance fish production in seasonal floodplains to improve and sustain rural livelihoods in Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Mali and Vietnam.

Harnessing the development potential of aquatic agricultural systems for the poor and vulnerable: CGIAR Research Program 1.3

Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) are widely distributed along the world's rivers and coasts. These are generally highly productive systems but multiple constraints limit the ability of poor smallholder families to harness this productivity in the form of improved food, nutrition and income. To help overcome these constraints and harness the full development potential of aquatic agricultural systems, a new action research program has been developed by the CGIAR. This research program brief highlights the key messages of this new initiative.

CGIAR Research Program. Aquatic agricultural systems

Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) are widely distributed along the world's rivers and coasts. These are generally highly productive systems but multiple constraints limit the ability of poor smallholder families to harness this productivity in the form of improved food, nutrition and income. To help overcome these constraints and harness the full development potential of aquatic agricultural systems, a new action research program has been developed by the CGIAR. This research program brief highlights the key messages of this new initiative.

Aquatic Agricultural Systems

More than 700 million people depend on aquatic agricultural systems for their livelihoods. These are diverse farming systems that include a mix of cultivation, livestock, aquaculture, fishing, and gathering natural resources such as fruits, seeds, timber and wildlife. However, there are many constraints that prevent low income smallholders from fully benefitting from these naturally productive systems. The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems starts from the premise that poverty is rarely caused solely by inadequate income or assets.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - CGIAR