Climate change, tropical fisheries and prospects for sustainable development

Tropical fisheries substantially contribute to the well-being of societies in both the tropics and the extratropics, the latter through ‘telecoupling’ — linkages between distant human–natural systems. Tropical marine habitats and fish stocks, however, are vulnerable to the physical and biogeochemical oceanic changes associated with rising greenhouse gases. These changes to fish stocks, and subsequent impacts on fish production, have substantial implications for the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

A training dialogue report: Introduction to Climate Services for Aquaculture

Aquaculture is critically important to food and nutrition security in Bangladesh. It provides 60 percent of animal protein requirements for Bangladeshis and makes up 3.65 percent of the country’s GDP . It has pulled more than 2 million of the 18 million Bangladeshis who came out from poverty. However, the sector is vulnerable and impacted by climate variability. High temperatures can affect fish growth and reproduction and erratic rainfall and fluctuation in temperature impact fish spawning. Shallow pond fish are particularly vulnerable to high temperatures.

Escaping the perfect storm of simultaneous climate change impacts on agriculture and marine fisheries

Climate change can alter conditions that sustain food production and availability, with cascading consequences for food security and global economies. Here, we evaluate the vulnerability of societies to the simultaneous impacts of climate change on agriculture and marine fisheries at a global scale.

Vulnerabilities in aquatic animal production

The role of aquatic animals in global food and nutrition security is increasingly recognised. The global demand for fish is increasing, leading to a need to significantly increase its supply. Securing future fish supplies through sustainable production is a challenge as major resources such as fresh water and land are becoming limited worldwide. Aquaculture and capture fisheries face various threats from both human-mediated and natural environmental change, including climate change. Aquaculture systems and practices are vulnerable to such changes.

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