Should enhanced resilience be an objective of natural resource management research for developing countries

Productivity enhancement has traditionally been the main focus of agricultural research to alleviate poverty and enhance food security of poor farmers in the developing world. Recently, the harmful impact of climate change, economic volatility, and other external shocks on poor farmers has led to concern that resilience should feature alongside productivity as a major objective of research.

Seasonal dynamics of physico-chemical characteristics and biological responses of Lake Chilwa, Southern Africa

Lake Chilwa is shared by Malawi and Mozambique, it supports an important fishery and its watershed is undergoing rapid population growth and increasing utilization for agricultural production. It is a shallow, closed basin lake with extensive surrounding wetlands; and it has suffered several desiccation events in the last century. To better understand the current condition of the lake, we monitored a suite of physical, chemical and biological parameters at approximately monthly intervals over an annual cycle in 2004–2005.

Predicting the impacts and socio-economic consequences of climate change on global marine ecosystems and fisheries: the QUEST_Fish framework

Climate change is accelerating and is already affecting the marine environment. Estimating the effects of climate change on the production of fish resources, and their dependent societies, is complex because of: difficulties of downscaling Global Climate Models (GCM) to scales of biological relevance; uncertainties over future net primary production and its transfer through the food chain; difficulties in separating the multiple stressors affecting fish production; and inadequate methodology to estimate human vulnerabilities to these changes.

A place at the table? (Commentary)

International organizations are calling for fisheries to be included in a new global deal on climate change. A consortium of 16 organizations including the UN Environment Programme (UNEP), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the World Bank and the WorldFish Center issued a policy brief to delegates meeting in Bonn from June 1-12 for the latest round of UN climate talks. Their key message was outlined in a Commentary by two of the authors of the brief published May 28 on Nature Reports Climate Change.

Mountain GIS: promoting geographic information and earth observation applications for the sustainable development of the Hindu Kush-Himalayan region

The Hindu Kush-Himalayan (HKH) region, home to the largest concentration of glaciers outside of the polar region, is the ‘water-tower’ of Asia. The HKH mountain ecosystem provides life support services to almost a third of humanity. Many mountain issues such as management of water resources, climate change, biodiversity conservation and hazard mitigation are interconnected in nature and, therefore, need to be considered holistically.

Mangrove revival diversifies livelihoods while addressing climate change

Funded by the Australian Government, The project "Poverty alleviation, mangrove conservation and climate change: Carbon offsets as payments for mangrove ecosystem services in Solomon Islands" explores whether or not mangroves can be included in offset projects. This brief outlines the key elements of the projects, its key deliverables. The project offers the Government of Solomon Islands timely advice and enhanced technical expertise to cope with the costs and challenges arising from climate change.

The impacts of El Nino on Philippine fisheries.

The El Nino phenomenon is an "anomalous climatic condition in the tropical Pacific region which occurs every two to seven years and affects the global climate". There is a greater increase in the water surface temperature of the eastern tropical and central tropical Pacific during an El Nino episode relative to that of the western tropical Pacific. The phenomenon causes fluctuations in rainfall, resulting in drought in some areas and heavy rainfall in others.

Impacts of climate variability and change on fishery-based livelihoods

There is increasing concern over the consequences of global warming for the food security and livelihoods of the world’s 36million fisherfolk and the nearly 1.5 billion consumers who rely on fish for more than 20% of their dietary animal protein. With mounting evidence of the impacts of climate variability and change on aquatic ecosystems, the resulting impacts on fisheries livelihoods are likely to be significant, but remain a neglected area in climate adaptation policy.

Gender and aquaculture: sharing the benefits equitably

Aquaculture is the fastest growing agricultural sector in the world; it can meet both the food security and cash needs of poor households in Africa and the Asia-Pacific region. Women’s involvement in aquaculture is more significant than often assumed. In many developing countries formal statistics often overlook the nature and extent of their vital contribution. Research on gender and aquaculture at the WorldFish Center identifies five key themes for consideration.

The future is now: how scenarios can help Senegalese and Mauritanian fisheries adapt to climate change

Localized changes in the productivity of marine and inland waters induced by climate change will pose new challenges to the fishery and the aquaculture sectors in West Africa. However, climate change does not occur in isolation of other drivers of change: processes of environmental, economic and social change can affect the fishery sector, potentially creating additional vulnerability to climate change. Scenarios are a useful tool to explore uncertainties and understand non-climatic drivers of change.

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