Gender-inclusive facilitation for community-based marine resource management. An addendum to ‘Community-based marine resource management in Solomon Islands: A facilitators guide’ and other guides for community-based resource management

Both women and men should be included in community-based marine resource management. To create an inclusive management process it is necessary to use deliberate and thoughtful and reflexive strategies that do not rely on or worsen existing power imbalances. Researchers using a reflexive strategy are self-aware and constantly reflecting on and critiquing their potential biases and how those might influence their research. In this paper we offer concrete examples of genderinclusive facilitation strategies that could be used as part of a larger reflexive community engagement process.

Evaluating the fit of co-management for small-scale fisheries governance in Timor-Leste

Fisheries co-management is an increasingly globalized concept, and a cornerstone of the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication, adopted by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization member states in 2014. Timor-Leste is a politically young country in the relatively rare position of having underexploited fisheries in some areas that can be leveraged to improve coastal livelihood outcomes and food and nutrition security.

CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agri-Food Systems: Annual Report 2018

This annual report provides key results and learning achieved during 2018 in the CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agri-Food Systems (FISH). FISH made significant progress during the year in (a) producing and disseminating a suite of research innovations for sustainable development of aquaculture and fisheries across Africa, Asia and the Pacific, and (b) in moving toward stronger results-based program management through development and adoption of a monitoring, evaluation and learning platform.

Participatory rural appraisal: Vulnerability study of Ayeyarwady delta fishing communities in Myanmar and social protection opportunities

This study seeks to inform fisheries management and social protection processes of the key vulnerability issues faced by fishers at five pilot sites selected for fisheries co-management within the research programme of the Myanmar Department of Fisheries, WorldFish and FAO on an Centre for International Agricultural Research(ACIAR) funded project. The PRA-V study also explored gender vulnerability aspects, focusing on female-headed households and individual women from fisher households.

Strengthening and scaling community-based approaches to Pacific coastal fisheries management in support of the New Song

In the small island developing states of the Pacific, catching, trading and eating fish are central to the way of life and local and national economies. Local and external pressures on marine resources, and high reliance on fisheries as a livelihood, mean that improving and sustaining fisheries benefits is a key pathway to improve human wellbeing and contribute to food and nutrition security. This project aims to improve the wellbeing of Pacific coastal communities through more resilient fisheries as a foundation. The project contributes to the Pacific Community's New Song strategy, which calls for a stronger, co-ordinated approach to developing and managing coastal fisheries. The project aims to: (1) strengthen Pacific institutions to implement the New Song for coastal fisheries; (2) improve and scale out CBFM in Kiribati, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu; (3) improve the opportunities, viability and performance of livelihoods in support of CBFM initiatives; (4) increase social and gender equity in coastal fisheries governance, utilization and benefit distribution; and (5) promote food and nutrition security in the Pacific food system through improved management and use of fish. The project builds on community-based management and multi-level governance efforts in preceding projects led by WorldFish with national and regional partners.

Narrative assemblages for power-balanced coastal and marine governance. Tara Bandu as a tool for community-based fisheries co-management in Timor-Leste

Poverty alleviation and resource governance are inextricably related. Mainstream resource management has been typically criticized by social scientists for the inherent power imbalances between fishery managers and small-scale fishing communities. Yet, while a number of mechanisms of collective action to address these power imbalances have been developed, they remain undertheorized.

Policy coherence with the small-scale fisheries guidelines: Analysing across scales of governance in Pacific small-scale fisheries

Concerns about the sustainability of small-scale fisheries, and the equitable distribution of fisheries benefits, are wide-spread within government agencies, non-government organizations, and rural fishing communities throughout Pacific Island Countries and Territories. Addressing these concerns was given renewed impetus in recent years with the completion and adoption of the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF Guidelines). This global document enters a complex policy landscape within the Pacific region.

Community-based fisheries management approach adopted in Bangladesh

The Community Based Fisheries Management (CBFM) Project, funded by the Ford Foundation (1994-1999) and the UK Government’s Department for International Development (2002- 2006), aimed to promote the sustainable use of, and equitable distribution of benefits from, inland fisheries resources by empowering communities to manage their own resources. The project was implemented by the WorldFish and the Government of Bangladesh’s Department of Fisheries (DoF) with the support of 11 NonGovernmental Organizations (NGOs).

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