Gender-inclusive facilitation for community-based marine resource management. An addendum to ‘Community-based marine resource management in Solomon Islands: A facilitators guide’ and other guides for community-based resource management

Both women and men should be included in community-based marine resource management. To create an inclusive management process it is necessary to use deliberate and thoughtful and reflexive strategies that do not rely on or worsen existing power imbalances. Researchers using a reflexive strategy are self-aware and constantly reflecting on and critiquing their potential biases and how those might influence their research. In this paper we offer concrete examples of genderinclusive facilitation strategies that could be used as part of a larger reflexive community engagement process.

Gender norms and relations: implications for agency in coastal livelihoods

Improving livelihoods and livelihood opportunities is a popular thrust of development investments. Gender and other forms of social differentiation influence individual agency to access, participate in, and benefit from existing, new, or improved livelihood opportunities. Recent research illustrates that many initiatives intended to improve livelihoods still proceed as “gender blind,” failing to account for the norms and relations that will influence how women and men experience opportunities and outcomes.

Gender integrated research for development in Pacific coastal fisheries

The project Strengthening and Scaling Communitybased Approaches to Pacific Coastal Fisheries in Management Support of the New Song (henceforth the Pathways project) aims to improve the wellbeing of Pacific coastal communities through more productive and resilient fisheries and better food and nutrition security. The project began in September 2017 and will end in June 2021. The objective of this brief is to illustrate the applied and diverse ways the Pathways project is integrating gender.

Strengthening and scaling community-based approaches to Pacific coastal fisheries management in support of the New Song

In the small island developing states of the Pacific, catching, trading and eating fish are central to the way of life and local and national economies. Local and external pressures on marine resources, and high reliance on fisheries as a livelihood, mean that improving and sustaining fisheries benefits is a key pathway to improve human wellbeing and contribute to food and nutrition security. This project aims to improve the wellbeing of Pacific coastal communities through more resilient fisheries as a foundation. The project contributes to the Pacific Community's New Song strategy, which calls for a stronger, co-ordinated approach to developing and managing coastal fisheries. The project aims to: (1) strengthen Pacific institutions to implement the New Song for coastal fisheries; (2) improve and scale out CBFM in Kiribati, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu; (3) improve the opportunities, viability and performance of livelihoods in support of CBFM initiatives; (4) increase social and gender equity in coastal fisheries governance, utilization and benefit distribution; and (5) promote food and nutrition security in the Pacific food system through improved management and use of fish. The project builds on community-based management and multi-level governance efforts in preceding projects led by WorldFish with national and regional partners.

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