Nearshore fish aggregating devices (FADs): A technology to boost fisheries production and combat malnutrition in Timor-Leste

Benefits of artisanal nearshore FADs in Timor-Leste • Food production and nutrition security: FADs provide an opportunity to increase the sustainable production of nutrient-rich food in Timor-Leste to combat chronic malnutrition. • Coastal resource management: FADS transfer fishing effort from the reef to the pelagic zone. • Climate change adaptation: FADS act as a food security buffer against socioeconomic and climate shocks, and they increase the resilience of coral reef ecosystems.

Illuminating Hidden Harvests: The contribution of small-scale fisheries to sustainable development

This brief provides an update on the status of the Illuminating Hidden Harvests (IHH) study and shares emerging insights on the need for better data collection and analysis, and additional monitoring capacity to improve our collective understanding of small-scale fisheries. This is critical to increasing government attention and improving policy responses and outcomes for the sector.

 

What influences the form that community-based fisheries management takes in Vanuatu

Vanuatu has a long history of efforts to manage coastal fisheries, from customary practices to various forms of contemporary community-based fisheries management (CBFM) promoted by non-governmental organisations and government projects. In this article we summarise how the experiences and lessons over the last 25 years have shaped the CBFM model Vanuatu now uses.

Supporting community-based resource management in Solomon Islands: The role of provincial governments

Rural communities in Solomon Islands rely heavily on coastal fisheries for food and income. However, coral reefs, mangroves and seagrass are degrading in many areas because of overharvesting, pollution and unsustainable land-use activities such as logging. The degradation of coastal fisheries has big implications for the food security and livelihoods of rural communities. The national government recognizes the importance of coastal fisheries and aims to ensure that 50 percent of coastal areas are sustainably managed by 2020.

Spreading community-based resource management: Testing the “lite-touch” approach in Solomon Islands

In Solomon Islands, community-based resource management (CBRM) is the main strategy for managing coastal fisheries. Although hundreds of communities have implemented CBRM already, the majority of Solomon Islands communities have not, and it is not realistic for partner organisations such as non-governmental organisations and government agencies to spread the concept of CBRM by engaging communities individually.

Sharing Pacific nearshore FAD expertise

Nearshore fish aggregating devices (FADs) are gaining momentum in the Pacific region as a tool to enhance food security and income for fishers and communities, and to reduce pressure on the resources of lagoons and reef fisheries. A lot of experience has been gained by countries across the Pacific. There have been, however, limited opportunities for nearshore FAD practitioners to come together to share this experience in order to advance the implementation and use of nearshore FADs in the Pacific.

The role of fish and fisheries in recovering from natural hazards: Lessons learned from Vanuatu

Coastal fisheries provide staple food and sources of livelihood in Pacific Island countries, and securing a sustainable supply is recognised as a critical priority for nutrition security. This study sought to better understand the role of fish for Pacific Island communities during disasters and in disaster recovery. To evaluate community impacts and responses after natural disasters, focus group discussions were held with men and women groups at ten sites across Shefa, Tafea, Malampa and Sanma provinces in Vanuatu.

Promoting gender equity and equality through the small-scale fisheries guidelines: Experiences from multiple case studies

Gender equity and equality is the fourth guiding principle of the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF Guidelines), and sits within its wider human rights framework. The SSF Guidelines contain acknowledgement of the roles of women in the small-scale fisheries value chain, the need for gender equity and equality in access to human well-being resources, and the need for equal gender participation in fisheries governance. While the inclusion of gender in the SSF Guidelines is unprecedented and encouraging, effective implementation is the critical next step.

Productivity and coastal fisheries biomass yields of the northeast coastal waters of the Bay of Bengal Large Marine Ecosystem

This paper describes the current marine fisheries situation in the northeast sector of the Bay of Bengal, ninety percent of which corresponds to Myanmar's EEZ and ten percent to Bangladesh. With the exception of the research carried out by the fisheries research vessel Fridtjof Nansen, the Myanmar sector is largely data deficient due to political reasons.

Policy coherence with the small-scale fisheries guidelines: Analysing across scales of governance in Pacific small-scale fisheries

Concerns about the sustainability of small-scale fisheries, and the equitable distribution of fisheries benefits, are wide-spread within government agencies, non-government organizations, and rural fishing communities throughout Pacific Island Countries and Territories. Addressing these concerns was given renewed impetus in recent years with the completion and adoption of the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF Guidelines). This global document enters a complex policy landscape within the Pacific region.

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