The role of fish and fisheries in recovering from natural hazards: Lessons learned from Vanuatu

Coastal fisheries provide staple food and sources of livelihood in Pacific Island countries, and securing a sustainable supply is recognised as a critical priority for nutrition security. This study sought to better understand the role of fish for Pacific Island communities during disasters and in disaster recovery. To evaluate community impacts and responses after natural disasters, focus group discussions were held with men and women groups at ten sites across Shefa, Tafea, Malampa and Sanma provinces in Vanuatu.

A preliminary assessment of the coastal fishery resources in India: socioeconomic and bioeconomic perspective

India is endowed with a continental shelf of 0.5 million km2 and an exclusive economic zone (EEZ) of about 2 million km2. Almost half (39%) of the Indian population utilizes the marine fisheries resources. India ranked sixth worldwide in total fish production (4.95 million t) and second in inland fish production (2.24 million t) during 1995 - 96. Fish production expanded from 0.75 million t in 1950 - 51 to 4.95 million t in 1995 - 96, giving a significant increase at a cumulative growth rate of 4.2% per annum.

Marine fisheries along the southwest coast of India

Marine fisheries production in India has increased from 0.5 million t in 1950 to 2.47 million t in 1997. The gross value of fisheries landings in India was US$2.37 billion in 1997. The contribution of fisheries to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) has risen from 0.7% in 1980 - 81 to 1.2% in 1994 - 95. The contribution to agricultural GDP has risen from 1.9% to 4%. Fisheries production also plays a critical role in food security and livelihood in rural areas.

Customary law and the evolution of coastal zone management

Although fisheries production in the Indo-Pacific has markedly increased, employment opportunities have diminished, social inequalities have been exacerbated and peasant fishing households have been further impoverished. Thevarious reasons as to why this has occurred are considered. It is thought that an equitable system of coastal zone management should pay particular attention to the needs of traditional coastal communities, especially as such communities are often underdeveloped sectors of nations which are severely disadvantaged in international terms.

Co-managing shared waters: a coastal governance experience of Western Visayas Region, Philippines

Coastal ecosystems in the Philippines are under stress from the combined effects of human overexploitation and habitat destruction. In recent years, the concept of an integrated approach to coastal resource management has been adopted to address this. This new paradigm, generally described as co-management, makes use of the participation of the different sectors (e.g. government, community) in the management process. CRMCs are multi-sectoral in nature with inter-LGU partnerships and different resource-sharing schemes.

Nearshore fish aggregating devices: a means of habitat protection and food security in post disaster Solomon Islands

In the aftermath of the tsunami in 2007, in an effort to assist communities in Western Province in Solomon Islands, the World Wide Fund for Nature, Solomon Islands (WWFSI) received funding from the David and Lucille Packard Foundation for a project on “Post-disaster fisheries and marine conservation recovery activities in the Western Province, Solomon Islands”.

Marine resources in Costa Rica.

Blessed with beautiful beaches, mangroves and coral reefs, fisheries in Costa Rica developed without a hasie resources management plan until the mid 1980s when protected areas were developed and integrated into the National System of Conservation Areas. With the boom in tourism as well as a decrease in fish landings due to overfishing, and an increase in pollution threatening the coastal areas, there is now a need for integrated management of marine resources. Costa Rica has made a deliberate choice for sustainable development.

Mangrove rehabilitation and coastal resource management: a case study of Cogtong Bay, Philippines.

The Cogtong Bay experience represents a bold attempt to pursue a shared responsibility between the government and local residents for rehabilitating coastal resources. Some of the factors that provided the impetus to co-management arrangements were the recognition of resource management problems, dependence on coastal resources for livelihood and the desire for more sustainable resource use.

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