Human-crocodile conflict in Solomon Islands

The Solomon Islands National Biodiversity Strategic Action Plan 2016–2020 identifies the need to develop a management plan for saltwater crocodiles. However, there is a lack of reliable information on the population status of saltwater crocodiles and the extent of human-crocodile conflict in the country. This report summarizes the results of a nationwide survey that aimed to fill these knowledge gaps.

Tales and stories of dugongs from Solomon Islands

In Solomon Islands, seagrass is found in almost every province. Large seagrass beds can be found in Western, Choiseul and Malaita provinces, and Lau lagoon contains the largest area of seagrass in the country. Seagrass beds are one of the most valuable habitats for Solomon Islanders. Fishers use them as fishing grounds, while farmers use them for mulching their gardens to enrich the soil and help improve their yield. Dugongs are important for keeping coastal habitats healthy, and they are a valuable source of food. In Solomon Islands, dugongs have high cultural value in many communities.

Conservation strategy for dugongs and seagrass habitats in Solomon Islands

This strategy provides direction for implementation of priority actions that are necessary for achieving effective conservation and management of dugong and seagrass habitats. It complements the Fisheries Management Act 2015 and the Wildlife Protection and Management Act (2017) ensuring sustainability of the resources. It also highlights the government’s commitment to continue to collaborate with international and national partners and communities in ensuring dugongs and healthy seagrass meadows are available for the future generations.

Priority actions for dugong and seagrass conservation in Solomon Islands

Dugongs (Dugon dugon) are seagrass community specialists that inhabit warm coastal and island areas from tropical to subtropical Indo-West Pacific waters. They feed primarily on seagrass. In August 2018, dugongs became protected under the Fisheries Management (Prohibited Activities) Regulations 2018. It is now prohibited to fish for, retain, be in possession of, buy or sell dugongs. It is punishable through a 40,000 penalty unit fine, 4 months imprisonment, or both. Dugongs hold high cultural significance in parts of Solomon Islands.

Fish, trade and food security: Moving beyond ‘availability’ discourse in marine conservation

The goal of food security increasingly serves as an objective and justification for marine conservation in the global south. In the marine conservation literature this potential link is seldom based upon detailed analysis of the socioeconomic pathways between fish and food security, is often based on limited assumptions about increasing the availability of fish stocks, and downplays the role of trade. Yet, the relationship between fish and food security is multi-faceted and complex, with various local contextual factors that mediate between fish and food security.

Exploring ‘islandness’ and the impacts of nature conservation through the lens of wellbeing

Motivated by growing concern as to the many threats that islands face, subsequent calls for more extensive island nature conservation and recent discussion in the conservation literature about the potential for wellbeing as a useful approach to understanding how conservation affects people's lives, this paper reviews the literature in order to explore how islands and wellbeing relate and how conservation might impact that relationship.

Strengthening community roles in aquatic resource governance in Uganda

Lake Victoria fisheries face severe environmental stresses. Stocks are declining in a context of increasing population and growing demand for the lake’s resources. Rising competition between users is putting conservation goals and rural livelihoods at risk. While Uganda’s co-management policy framework is well-developed, key resources for implementation are lacking, enforcement is poor, and the relations between stakeholders are unequal. Poor rural resource users face significant challenges to effectively participate in fisheries decision-making.

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