Solomon Islands State of the Coral Triangle Report: Summary

The Solomon Islands National Plan of Action (SI-NPOA): Coral Triangle Initiative on Coral Reefs, Fisheries, and Food Security (CTI-CFF) provides visionary guidance for the management of coral reefs and related ecosystems in the Solomon Islands (Ministry of Environment, Climate Change, Disaster Management and Meteorology and Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources, 2010). It is consistent with the CTI Regional Plan of Action (RPOA), but also incorporates local situations and circumstances.

Phylogeography of a pearl oyster (Pinctada maxima) across the Indo-Australian Archipelago: evidence of strong regional structure and population expansions but no phylogenetic breaks

This study investigates the genetic structure and phylogeography of a broadcast spawning bivalve mollusc, Pinctada maxima, throughout the Indo-West Pacific and northern Australia. DNA sequence variation of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene was analysed in 367 individuals sampled from nine populations across the Indo-West Pacific.

Optimising the use of nearshore fish aggregating devices for food security in the Pacific Islands

It is widely recognised that anchored, nearshore fish aggregating devices (FADs) are one of the few practical ‘vehicles’ for increasing access to tuna to help feed the rapidly growing rural and urban populations in many Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs). However, considerable planning, monitoring and research is still needed to understand and fulfil the potential of nearshore FADs.

Marine Protected Areas in the Coral Triangle: Progress, Issues, and Option

The six Coral Triangle countries-Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Solomon Islands, and Timor-Leste-each have evolving systems of marine protected areas (MPAs) at the national and local levels. More than 1,900 MPAs covering 200,881 km2 (1.6% of the exclusive economic zone for the region) have been established within these countries over the last 40 years under legal mandates that range from village level traditional law to national legal frameworks that mandate the protection of large areas as MPAs.

Food security versus environment conservation: A case study of Solomon Islands' small-scale fisheries

The sustainable management of small-scale fisheries in coral reef ecosystems constitutes a difficult objective not least because these fisheries usually face several worsening pressures, including demographic growth and climate change. The implications are crucial in terms of food security as fish represents the major protein source for local populations in many regions reliant on small-scale fisheries. The case of the Solomon Islands’ fishery presented in this paper represents an illustrative example of these issues.

Fishing dynamics associated with periodically harvested marine closures

Periodically-harvested fisheries closures are emerging as a socially acceptable and locally implementable way to balance concerns about conserving ecosystem function and sustaining livelihoods. Across the Indo-Pacific periodically-harvested closures are commonly employed, yet their contribution towards more sustainable fisheries remains largely untested in the social and ecological context of tropical small-scale fisheries.

Do non-users value coral reefs?: Economic valuation of conserving Tubbataha Reefs, Philippines

The main purpose of the study is to determine whether non-use values exist among residents of Quezon City, hundreds of kilometers away from Tubbataha Reefs. The dichotomous choice contingent valuation method (CVM) was employed across 800 randomly selected respondents, 400 of which were personally interviewed (PI) and 400 were asked to accomplish self-administered (SA) questionnaires, 198 of the latter were found useable for the study.

The use of wild-caught juveniles in coastal aquaculture and its application to coral reef fishes

Worldwide, there are many substantial coastal aquaculture and stock enhancement operations based on collection of wild juveniles. These include: growout of shrimp (Penaeidae), milkfish (Chanos chanos), eels (Anguilla spp.), yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata), southern bluefin tuna (Thunnus maccoyii), edible oysters (Ostreidae) and mussels (Mytilidae); stock enhancement of scallops (Pectinidae); and the culture of pearls in farmed blacklip pearl oysters (Pinctada margaritifera). The growout of wild puerulus larvae of spiny lobsters (Palinuridae) is also developing rapidly.

Reference area as a factor affecting potential yield estimates of coral reef fishes

A compilation of 48 estimates of Caribbean and Pacific coral reef fish catches, ranging from 0.1 to 23.7 t km super(-2) year super(-1), obtained from coral reef areas ranging from 0.1 to nearly 4-10 super(5) km super(2), are used to show that observed catches, and hence potential yield estimates, depend strongly on the reference area. The implications for coral reef fisheries assessments are discussed.

Ocean sciences in relation to living resources

A major new international research program of importance to fisheries is likely to be adopted later this year. Ocean Sciences in Relation to Living Resources, sponsored by FAO and IOC, a proposal concerning the relationship between ocean variability and fish variability has been developed by a special group, as well as suggestions for incremental development of a broader program on the relationship of ocean science and living resources.

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