Capacitating Farmers and Fishers to Manage Climate Risks in South Asia (CaFFSA)

Climate variability has a profound influence on fisheries and agriculture in South Asia. CaFFSA will innovate in the delivery of climate services to 330,000 farm households in India (Andhra Pradesh and Odisha states) and 150,000 fish farming households in Odisha and Bangladesh (Barisal, Sylhet and Khulna divisions). Timely, reliable and contextualized climate information will profoundly change the climate risk equation in sectors that underpin the food security of millions. The project will build on the existing expertise of CGIAR and partnerships with national agencies, agricultural service and credit institutions to design and deliver scalable products, with an aim to reach more than 600,000 people by 2021.

This work was implemented as part of the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), which is carried out with support from CGIAR Fund Donors and through bilateral funding agreements. This project is led by the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT).

The role of fish and fisheries in recovering from natural hazards: Lessons learned from Vanuatu

Coastal fisheries provide staple food and sources of livelihood in Pacific Island countries, and securing a sustainable supply is recognised as a critical priority for nutrition security. This study sought to better understand the role of fish for Pacific Island communities during disasters and in disaster recovery. To evaluate community impacts and responses after natural disasters, focus group discussions were held with men and women groups at ten sites across Shefa, Tafea, Malampa and Sanma provinces in Vanuatu.

Economic analysis of climate change adaptation strategies in selected coastal areas in Indonesia, Philippines and Vietnam

This report is an account of a cross-country study that covered Vietnam, Indonesia and the Philippines. Covering four sites (one each in Indonesia and Vietnam) and two sites in the Philippines, the study documented the impacts of three climate hazards affecting coastal communities, namely typhoon/flooding, coastal erosion and saltwater intrusion. It also analyzed planned adaptation options, which communities and local governments can implement, as well as autonomous responses of households to protect and insure themselves from these hazards.

Shocks, recovery trajectories and resilience among aquaculture-dependent households in post-tsunami Aceh, Indonesia

Aquaculture-dependent households in Bireuen District, Aceh, Indonesia, have in recent years endured repeated, diverse shocks; multiple economic shocks, shrimp disease, civil war and the 2004 Asian tsunami. Following the tsunami, extensive international aid efforts were directed at aquaculture pond rehabilitation. Yet, the pitfalls of simply recreating a system that was run down, underperforming and environmentally damaging due to the ongoing effects of multiple previous shocks are clear.

Fisheries production systems, climate change and climate variability in West Africa: an annotated bibliography

This bibliography is intended for people who are involved in fisheries, aquaculture, climate change, disaster management and policy development in West Africa or interested in one or more of these issues. The literature in this bibliography includes peer-reviewed journals, books and book chapters, grey reports and institutional technical papers, but is restricted to literature in English. Each citation also includes an abstract.

Rebuilding boats may not equal rebuilding livelihoods

This brief on post-tsunami rehabilitation was developed by the WorldFish Center. It is one of a series of policy briefs being developed by CONSRN (Consortium to Restore Shattered Livelihoods in TsunamiDevastated Nations) to assist in the rehabilitation efforts following the 26 December 2004 tsunami. The brief was developed under the auspices of CONSRN but does not imply endorsement by all agencies.

Fisheries rehabilitation in post-tsunami Aceh: Status and needs from participatory appraisals.

The widespread and long-term nature of the tsunami damage in Aceh province, Indonesia has threatened the continued use of coastal and fisheries resources. This article describes the application of the Rapid Appraisal of Fisheries Management System (RAFMS) methodology and presents key findings from the participatory appraisals in 15 study sites. The focus is on changes in the number and types of fishing boats and fishing effort, consumption and marketing flow patterns and community perspectives on livelihood options.

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