Fish for life: rehabilitating lives after natural disasters

Coastal areas, whose inhabitants are often dependant on fish for food and income, are increasingly those most affected by natural disasters. This video takes a look at how one remote fishing community in Aceh Indonesia, which was totally destroyed following the 2004 tsunami, is benefiting from rehabilitation efforts by WorldFish that put the community at the heart of planning and implementing new options for their future.

Promoting multi-stakeholder contributions to international cooperation on sustainable solutions for aquaculture development in South-East Asia

The European Union is the world’s largest importer of seafood products, mainly from Asia. The growth of aquaculture in Asia has been remarkable, but it also raises environmental concerns and poses serious challenges in terms of sustainability, social equity and suitable technologies. To establish sustainable aquaculture practices that improve resource efficiency and reduce environmental impact, the project will establish standards for aquaculture site planning, animal health, food product safety and farm governance. A key aim is to launch a multi-stakeholder platform—the European-Asian Technology and Innovation Platform—to foster international cooperation on sustainable aquaculture between Europe and South-East Asia.

Rebuilding Fisheries After Typhoon Yolanda in the Philippines

In 2013, Typhoon Haiyan devastated large areas of the Philippines, destroying vital sources of livelihoods for many rural households. This project aims to rebuild livelihoods through cash grants for fishers to help them to revive the aquaculture and sea fisheries sectors in the worst affected areas of Eastern Samar and Leyte. Specifically, the project seeks to rebuild mud crab, blue crab, milkfish and tilapia aquaculture as well as seaweed farming within local communities and assist with links to potential markets for the produce.

Investing in Hope: Rusli's story

The 2004 tsunami that devastated the province of Aceh in Indonesia left in its wake thousands of communities without homes and destroyed the livelihood of farmers who worked the land to produce rice, fish and shrimp. WorldFish, in partnership with the Aceh Society Development (ASD) Cooperative, has helped to put communities back on their feet through providing vital assistance in the development of local small-scale aquaculture enterprises.

Enhancing climate resilience of aquatic-agriculture systems in Bangladesh

Moshni is typical of many small villages in the vast coastal delta region of Bangladesh, where the population depends largely on agriculture and aquaculture for food, nutrition and income.

The people of this coastal region, and the aquatic agricultural systems their livelihoods depend on, are particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. These include increased frequency of flooding due to sea-level rise, elevated salinity in agricultural areas, greater monsoon precipitation, and increased vulnerability to cyclone and storm surges, drought.

Post-disaster rehabiliatation teaches resilience in Bangladesh

In November 2007, Cyclone Sidr devastated southern Bangladesh, taking more than 3000 lives and causing USD$2 billion in damage. “Sidr took our crops, fishpond and house, leaving us hopeless,” recalls Gita Roy of Jhalakathi District, who was one of thousands to lose both her home and her source of food and income.

In response to the disaster WorldFish led a USAID-funded project to restore the productive capacity of 46,500 fish, prawn and shrimp-farming households, and capture lessons on how to make disaster-prone coastal communities more resilient.  

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