Reproductive biology and ecology of the green mussel Perna viridis: A multidisciplinary approach

A multidisciplinary approach was applied to explore deeper knowledge about the reproductive biology and ecology of the green mussel (Perna viridis) by interlinking among ecological factors, ingested gut plankton, gonad fatty acid profile, and reproductive traits. Mussels were collected throughout the year from the coastal region of the Bay of Bengal of Bangladesh, and the histological analysis of 242 mussels revealed five stages of gametogenesis with an annual spawning season from January to April.

Hilsa: Status of fishery and potential for aquaculture

Hilsa: Status of Fishery and Potential for Aquaculture is a proceedings book, which is edited by an international team of experts and authored by 10 international expert teams working on different disciplines of the hilsa shad. Hilsa is a widely distributed fish within the Bay of Bengal region and harvested in the waters of Bangladesh, India and Myanmar. It is famous worldwide for its delicious taste and superb texture, which persist for a long time. Hilsa is unique in that it contains high amounts of both proteins and lipids.

Fine-scale population structure and ecotypes of anadromous Hilsa shad (Tenualosa ilisha) across complex aquatic ecosystems revealed by NextRAD genotyping

The anadromous Hilsa shad (Tenualosa ilisha) live in the Bay of Bengal and migrate to the estuaries and freshwater rivers for spawning and nursing of the juveniles. This has led to two pertinent questions: (i) do all Hilsa shad that migrate from marine to freshwater rivers come from the same population? and (ii) is there any relationship between adults and juveniles of a particular habitat? To unravel the answers of the above two questions, the present study was conducted by identifying a set of neutral and adaptive genetic markers.

Wetlands

After commencing with a summary of the current status, importance and productivity of natural wetlands, the chapter reviews the contribution of wetland ecological functions to sustaining vital ecosystem services. Wetlands are vulnerable to a range of anthropogenic pressures, notably land use change, disruption to regional hydrological regimes as a result of abstraction and impoundment, pollution and excessive nutrient loading, the introduction of invasive species and overexploitation of biomass, plants and animals.

Trophic model of the coastal fisheries ecosystem of the west coast of peninsular Malaysia

A preliminary mass-balance trophic model was constructed for the coastal fisheries ecosystem of the West Coast of Peninsular Malaysia (0 - 120 m depth). The ecosystem was partitioned into 15 trophic groups, and biomasses for selected groups were obtained from research (trawl) surveys conducted in the area in 1987 and 1991. Trophic interactions of the groups are presented. The network analysis indicates that fishing fleets for demersal fishes and prawns have a major direct or indirect impact on most high-trophic level groups in the ecosystem.

Increased production of small fish in wetlands combats micronutrient deficiencies in Bangladesh

Increased production of mola and other small fish can be achieved through stock enhancement and sustainable management of natural wetlands. Enhanced fish production can increase consumption and provide nutritional benefits, especially for women and young children, as they suffer from high rates of malnutrition, including micronutrient deficiencies. Mola and other small fish, which are eaten whole, have high contents of vitamins and minerals. In recent years, there has been a reduction in fish production and biodiversity in wetland areas of Bangladesh.

Genomics in marine monitoring: New opportunities for assessing marine health status

This viewpoint paper explores the potential of genomics technology to provide accurate, rapid, and cost efficient observations of the marine environment. The use of such approaches in next generation marine monitoring programs will help achieve the goals of marine legislation implemented world-wide. Genomic methods can yield faster results from monitoring, easier and more reliable taxonomic identification, as well as quicker and better assessment of the environmental status of marine waters.

Fish, sediment and dams in the Mekong

The Mekong River is home to the largest inland fishery in the world, which is due in part to its exceptional sediment and nutrient loads. The number of dams in the Basin is expected to increase from 16 in the year 2000 to between 77 and 136 by 2030. These dams retain and accumulate sediments and nutrients in their reservoirs; as such, planned dam development is expected to result in a 60% to 96% reduction in sediment flow to downstream Mekong waters.

Fish resources in Cambodia (2001-2011)

Cambodian inland fish resources are part of the Mekong system. With 781 known freshwater and brackish fish species, the Mekong Basin has the second highest fish biodiversity in the world after the Amazon Basin in South America. Cambodia itself features 461 freshwater species, plus 468 marine species and 26 species found in both environments. This makes 955 fish species in total.

Community-based marine resource management in Solomon Islands: A facilitators guide. Based on lessons from implementing CBRM with rural coastal communities in Solomon Islands (2005-2013)

This guide was developed to document the process and activities that WorldFish staff have used and adapted as facilitators working with communities interested in marine resource management in Solomon Islands. It draws on the experiences from work conducted with FSPI and MFMR through ACIAR funded projects, with communities that had a primary interest in the management of coral reef fisheries. Since 2011 the process has been trialed and adapted further with communities interested in mangrove ecosystem management (through the MESCAL project).

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